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[Xmca-l] Re: xmca new discussion started



Thanks Martin,

I do not view what I am saying--though it is differently said---from what
you quote. The important part of the quotation is this: "*the methods* in
and through which members concertedly produce and assemble," and these
include making the very production and assembly available to each other. In
all of this, some things are unquestioned, and Garfinkel wrote considerably
on the invisible background assumption . . .

Michael


Wolff-Michael Roth, Lansdowne Professor

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Applied Cognitive Science
MacLaurin Building A567
University of Victoria
Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2
http://web.uvic.ca/~mroth <http://education2.uvic.ca/faculty/mroth/>

New book: *The Mathematics of Mathematics
<https://www.sensepublishers.com/catalogs/bookseries/new-directions-in-mathematics-and-science-education/the-mathematics-of-mathematics/>*

On Thu, Jun 1, 2017 at 5:39 PM, Martin John Packer <mpacker@uniandes.edu.co>
wrote:

> Hi Wolff-Michael,
>
> I agree with most of what you’ve written, but not the suggestion that EM
> starts from the assumption that people (simply) make visible order that has
> its origins somewhere else. I’ll quote from an encyclopedia article by Doug
> Maynard and Teddy Kardash:
>
>
> Ethnomethodology is an area in sociology originating in the work of Harold
> Garfinkel. It represents an effort to study the methods in and through
> which members concertedly produce and assemble the features of everyday
> life in any actual, concrete, and not hypothetical or theoretically
> depicted setting…. Members of society achieve this intelligible
> organization through actual, coordinated, concerted, procedural behaviors
> or methods and practices.
>
>  Martin
>
> On Jun 1, 2017, at 7:27 PM, Wolff-Michael Roth <
> wolffmichael.roth@gmail.com<mailto:wolffmichael.roth@gmail.com>> wrote:
>
> Martin,
> I would have thought that ethno*methodology* is the study of the methods,
> the work, people use to make social orders visible. In this, it is very
> different from all other research, qualitative and quantitative. Garfinkel
> describes it as *incommensurably different *from, among others,
> interpretive studies of social life. He distinguishes EM from formal
> analytic studies, all those that have to specify methods because these
> methods are different from the methods people use in everyday life. EM does
> not dispute the results of other research; its interests are completely
> elsewhere.
> Practically, EM is interested in change if it is what people do; it is not
> interested in the change but how people do make change and the required
> work visible to each other.
> Michael
>
>
> Wolff-Michael Roth, Lansdowne Professor
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> --------------------
> Applied Cognitive Science
> MacLaurin Building A567
> University of Victoria
> Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2
> http://web.uvic.ca/~mroth <http://education2.uvic.ca/faculty/mroth/>
>
> New book: *The Mathematics of Mathematics
> <https://www.sensepublishers.com/catalogs/bookseries/new-
> directions-in-mathematics-and-science-education/the-
> mathematics-of-mathematics/>*
>
> On Thu, Jun 1, 2017 at 5:12 PM, Alfredo Jornet Gil <a.j.gil@iped.uio.no
> <mailto:a.j.gil@iped.uio.no>>
> wrote:
>
> Larry, I also was thinking that visibility, in other EM/CA studies also as
> instructability, speaks to change. A
> ________________________________________
> From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu<mailto:xmca-l-bounces@
> mailman.ucsd.edu> <xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu<mailto:xmca-l-bounces@
> mailman.ucsd.edu>>
> on behalf of Larry Purss <lpscholar2@gmail.com<mailto:lpscholar2@gmail.com
> >>
> Sent: 02 June 2017 01:44
> To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: xmca new discussion started
>
> Martin,
> This sentence,
> “Creating and sustaining order always requires change”
> And therefore makes visible change as the norm
> Seems to be pregnant with an evocative enacting of possibility for novel
> kinds of social fabric[continuing with the weaving theme]
>
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>
> From: Alfredo Jornet Gil
> Sent: June 1, 2017 4:18 PM
> To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: xmca new discussion started
>
> Yes, I agree with what you say. I guess I used the word change where I
> meant development. So I am going to change my question:
>
> What do and could do researchers concerned with development (social,
> personal) with EM.
>
> You recently shared with us a beautiful book on the topic of development.
> How does EM feature in it?
> Alfredo
> ________________________________________
> From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu<mailto:xmca-l-bounces@
> mailman.ucsd.edu> <xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu<mailto:xmca-l-bounces@
> mailman.ucsd.edu>>
> on behalf of Martin John Packer <mpacker@uniandes.edu.co<mailto:
> mpacker@uniandes.edu.co>>
> Sent: 02 June 2017 00:40
> To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: xmca new discussion started
>
> Hi Alfredo,
>
> I’ve always thought that EM deals very well with change, because it does
> not treat stasis as the norm. EM is the study of the methods that people
> (actants) employ to create and sustain order, various kinds of order.
> Creating and sustaining order always requires change.
>
> Martin
>
>
>
> On Jun 1, 2017, at 5:24 PM, Alfredo Jornet Gil <a.j.gil@iped.uio.no
> <mailto:a.j.gil@iped.uio.no>
> <mailto:a.j.gil@iped.uio.no>> wrote:
>
> I personally find ethnomethodology EM fascinating and a powerful approach
> to stick the realities of social life; but I always wondered what does EM
> do with questions of change.
>
>
>
>
>
>