[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

[Xmca-l] Re: A methodological question



Thanks David and Ed and all.






On 10 February 2017 at 00:55, Edward Wall <ewall@umich.edu> wrote:

> David
>
>     I was thinking of the SFL version of RST (I think - although I didn’t
> check - that the particular tool on this site incorporates some of
> Mathiessen’s ideas). If you know differently, I would appreciate that
> information. I think, doing as you did in your previous email, would work
> well also, but there is, perhaps, with this tool less of a learning curve.
>
> Ed
>
> > On Feb 9, 2017, at  4:39 PM, David Kellogg <dkellogg60@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Right, Ed. Note that there is a systemic-functional version of RST
> > developed by Christian Matthiessen (using "elaboration", "extension", and
> > "enhancement" as the main logico-semantic relations that are realized in
> > parataxis, hypotaxis, and embedding (these are structurally different,
> but
> > we can functionally relate them).
> >
> > I've always wondered if there is something developmental going on here.
> > It's a grammatical expression of the genetic law, because parataxis is
> > easily SHARED between speakers, hypotaxis is more intra-mental, and
> > "embedding" is when that intra-mentality can be assumed.
> >
> > The latest analysis I did showed no statistically significant change
> > between first graders and sixth graders in Korean schools in their
> > hypotaxis and parataxis, but a big change in embedding. I think one of
> the
> > reasons that Castro's speeches are so long is that when he embeds, he
> > unpacks with taxis. But the lack of statistical significance in taxis was
> > due to extreme variations within groups, dwarfing the variations between
> > them. The embedding was significant between groups: one of the things
> that
> > kids learn about Korean is how to embed.
> >
> > Castro: "This nation has had to face the taming of not one tiger, not two
> > tigers, not three tigers, but the taming of 1,000 tigers."
> >
> > Embedding: "of ...." is rankshifted--a noun is embedded in a noun group
> >
> > Castro: "Someone once said that it was a paper tiger, and it is, from a
> > strategic point of view, because some day it will cease being the world's
> > owner."
> >
> > Unpacking: "it was a paper tiger" unpacks "tiger" into a sentence
> > (elaboration) and then explains (enhancement)
> >
> > David Kellogg
> > Macquarie University
> >
> >
> >
> > On Fri, Feb 10, 2017 at 7:08 AM, Edward Wall <ewall@umich.edu> wrote:
> >
> >> Ulivi
> >>
> >> This is only a suggestion, but you might find rhetorical structure
> theory
> >> interesting if you want to get at embedding (there is a tool for
> analysis
> >> and some discussion: http://www.sfu.ca/rst/06tools/ )
> >>
> >> Ed
> >>> On Feb 9, 2017, at  3:43 PM, Ulvi İçil <ulvi.icil@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Dear xmcas,
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> I would like to direct to you a methodological question and to kindly
> >> have
> >>> your idea.
> >>>
> >>> I am reading Fidel Castro's speeches. They are full of critiques of
> >>> neoliberal globalization, capitalism and so on.
> >>>
> >>> If I would like to study those speeches in terms of the adult
> educational
> >>> aspects, elements they possess (because they are addresses to
> conscience
> >>> of the adult world, mostly Cuban people, various sections of Cuban
> people
> >>> and society) I wonder what would be the best methodology.
> >>>
> >>> For a study something like: Critical discourse in Fidel Castro's
> >> speeches.
> >>>
> >>> Not CDA, I suppose, because, my aim will not be looking at what lies
> >> behind
> >>> and hidden in these speeches, because they already demystify capitalism
> >>> etc. which means that as an analyst I have a subjectivity which is on
> the
> >>> side of Castro rather than aiming at criticizing him, I intend to make
> >>> visible what he criticizes in the global neoliberal world.
> >>>
> >>> Discourse analysis?
> >>>
> >>> Thinking that I intend to include into the study all the emotional,
> >>> spiritual elements in those speeches, with many evaluations,
> >> qualifications
> >>> like "teaching, medicine nobel professions" etc.
> >>>
> >>> Should I study something on the line like "critical discourse
> (embedded)
> >> in
> >>> Fidel Castro's speeches"?
> >>>
> >>> If yes, how?
> >>>
> >>> And if not, what may be the best possible methodological alternative?
> >>>
> >>> It is so interesting that while I studied the valuable works of Norman
> >>> Fairclough on CDA, on the critique of globalisation etc, which, for the
> >>> focus of study, they have, various aspects of capitalist, transnational
> >>> company discourse etc, I found that same critique not as an analysis,
> >> but,
> >>> itself, in Fidel Castro's public speeches, criticizing neoliberal
> >>> globalisation etc, so how to study Castro's speech texts?!
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Thank you very much.
> >>>
> >>> Ulvi
> >>
> >>
> >>
>
>
>