Re: the "i" word etc.

From: Kris Gutierrez (gutierrez@gseis.ucla.edu)
Date: Wed Mar 30 2005 - 23:21:30 PST


Andrew, I hope you post both articles! thanx. Kris

Kris D. Gutierrez
Professor
GSE&IS
Moore Hall 1026
UCLA
Los Angeles, CA 9009501521
310-825-7467
On Mar 30, 2005, at 9:29 PM, Andrew Babson wrote:

> Don, you've inspired me to break away from "breaking away" for a
> minute to muse about my favorite intellectual problem children-
> metaphor and "identity". As you are all aware, much ink has been
> spilled on both topics, and it's also that time of the semester, so I
> can't devote nearly as much time to discussing them now. But I can
> highly recommend an article by Rogers Brubaker and Fred Cooper (2000)
> as a starting point for "breaking away" from the term identity
> ("Beyond Identity", Theory and Society 29: 1-47).
>
> For an assessment of anthropological takes on metaphor, I have an
> article coming out in the next Semiotica (1531/4, 130) that might be
> of interest. Shameless plug, but what the heck.
>
> Best,
> Andrew
>
> Cunningham, Donald J. wrote:
> Grinch, huh. That must account for the green ring around some of the
> quarries.
>
> It's my bed time so I will be brief but there are several literatures
> one could consult. David Kirshner cited one today, identity. The stone
> cutter has a well established identity but this identity does not allow
> him to feel comfortable in the building his stone enabled. The son is
> struggling with his identity. He says he is a "cutter" (the actual term
> we use is "stoney"). His father disagrees! So what is he?
>
> I link identity and umwelt, one's personal world. The strength of the
> movie "Breaking Away" is that it touched a "real" difference that
> persists to this day in Bloomington. I'm sure a number of university
> towns have the same town/gown issues. Is learning the acquisition of
> skills or the cultivation of an identity that others come to recognize?
> Wenger's recent work is another literature that has stressed identity.
> Most of the "social semiotic" literature is about this. One
> discontinuity is that between the identity an individual assumes for
> him/her self and what others recognize. I for example, am a legend only
> in my own mind!
>
> None of this is particularly empirical in what I take to be the spirit
> of your request. What would you prefer?
>
> Don Cunningham
> Indiana University
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Mike Cole [ mailto:lchcmike@gmail.com ]
> Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2005 9:49 PM
> To: xmca@weber.ucsd.edu
> Subject: Re: Capitalism Sucks - RE: Breaking away?
>
> Sorry to be playing the grinch here because I love all the examples.
> But, Don (your
> message is most recent) could you point us ot an empirical study of
> development
> (the functional reorganization of psychological processes with respect
> to each other and the way they relate organism and environment -- a
> provisional LSV-type
> definition) that would allow us as educators-developers to be in a
> position to promote the process thought to be desirable?
> mike
>
>
> On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 21:41:56 -0500, Cunningham, Donald J.
> <cunningh@indiana.edu> wrote:
>
> Pretty scary, Tony. That is exactly the scene I cite and that I have
> indexed on my video tape. That and the scene where he discovers that
>
> the
>
> "Italian" bike team cheats. Could you leave it up or let me post it on
>
> a
>
> server here (no real Hoosier would object)?
>
> Here again, the "irritation of doubt" promotes growth.
>
> Barbara Barrie often quotes Marx in the film so Paul Dooley was
> undoubtedly about to offer a pithy quote then thought better of
> it.......djc
>
> Don Cunningham
> Indiana University
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Tony Whitson [ mailto:twhitson@udel.edu ]
> Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2005 9:13 PM
> To: mcole@weber.ucsd.edu ; xmca@weber.ucsd.edu
> Subject: Capitalism Sucks - RE: Breaking away?
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Mike Cole [ mailto:lchcmike@gmail.com ]
> Still in the realm of fiction, Don. Hoosier style?
> mike -----------
> -----------------
>
> maybe, Mike, but there can be much truth in fiction.
>
> Breaking Away is a great movie -- won Academy Award for Best
>
> Screenplay.
>
> It also contains the most succinct presentation I know of Marx's
>
> theory
>
> of
> alienation: ("Capital is dead labour, that, vampire-like, only lives
>
> by
>
> sucking living labour, and lives the more, the more labour it sucks."
> Capital Vol. I Chapter Ten )
>
> In other words, the material conditions that limit the freedom of
>
> living
>
> workers are imposed by the appropriation past ("dead") labor, which,
>
> in
>
> the
> form of capital, dictates the conditions of employment for current
> ("living") labor.
>
> The scene takes place outside the IU's (limestone) library building.
> A PDF file slideshow of the scene can be downloaded from
> www.udel.edu/educ/whitson/files/BA2library.pdf
>
> Because of the file size [1.5 Meg] I will keep the file there only for
> the
> next two weeks.
>
> Bonus question for Don Cunningham (or anybody else who's seen this
>
> movie
>
> more than once):
>
> What did the father stop himself from telling the son (which would
>
> have
>
> completed the sentence that begins "Well, your mom ...") ?
>
> I never made this connection before, but it reminds me of
> Sennett's "Hidden Injuries of Class."
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Cunningham, Donald J. [ mailto:cunningh@indiana.edu ]
> Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2005 8:23 PM
> To: xmca@weber.ucsd.edu
> Subject: Breaking away?
>
> http://movies.yahoo.com/shop?d=hv&id=1800041061&cf=info&intl=us
>
> Don Cunningham
> Indiana University
>
> On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 20:22:51 -0500, Cunningham, Donald J.
> <cunningh@indiana.edu> wrote:
>
> http://movies.yahoo.com/shop?d=hv&id=1800041061&cf=info&intl=us
>
> Don Cunningham
> Indiana University
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>



This archive was generated by hypermail 2b29 : Fri Apr 01 2005 - 01:00:06 PST