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[Xmca-l] Re: Publishers seek removal of millions of papers from ResearchGate



Hi Anne Nelly-

There are two unpublished studies of earlier eras of xmca on the website at
lchcautobio.ucsd.edu. We have pretty good archives back to the mid 1980's
but so far as I know, no one has take them as an object of study. I use
them as
a source of information about perennial discussion topics.

Its open source!
:-)
mike

On Mon, Oct 9, 2017 at 12:50 AM, PERRET-CLERMONT Anne-Nelly <
Anne-Nelly.Perret-Clermont@unine.ch> wrote:

> Mike
> has someone written the history of LCHC and xmca and of its pioneering
> technical/socio-cultural "educational" innovations?
> Xmcy was the first electronic list I ever signed up to.
>
> Anne-Nelly
> -----Message d'origine-----
> De : <xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu> on behalf of mike cole
> <mcole@ucsd.edu>
> Répondre à : "eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity" <xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu>
> Date : dimanche, 8 octobre 2017 22:35
> À : "eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity" <xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu>
> Objet : [Xmca-l] Re: Publishers seek removal of millions of papers
> from    ResearchGate
>
> Alfredo, Anne Nelly et al ---
>
> The difficulties to accessing academic research at play in this discussion
> motivates my long time treatment of xlchc/xmca as an *educational *
> facility.
> If you check out the cluster map of xmca that tells you where people are
> connecting from, it gives you are pretty good idea of who has interest and
> access. ( https://clustrmaps.com/site/17i )
>
> A LOT of those visitors do not have access to the articles, never mind the
> books, that we seek to discuss here in order to educate ourselves and our
> students in fundamental questions about human development in its cultural,
> historical, social contexts. If we do not post such materials, we are
> sealed off from each other as in the past.
>
> Lets hope that going forward, MCA and this discussion group can hold itself
> together as an educational community sufficiently to ward off the digital
> overseers.
>
> Its not clear how to get to open access, but this has been lchc's way of
> trying.
>
> mike
>
> On Sun, Oct 8, 2017 at 9:56 AM, Glassman, Michael <glassman.13@osu.edu>
> wrote:
>
> > The trouble we are facing is that ademia.edu and researchgate are not
> > organizations that were formed to serve the public good. They will only
> > function as Open Educational Resources as long as it suits their needs.
> > They are instead being funded by large amounts of venture capital.
> > Eventually these people are going to want their profits.  What is scary
> >is
> > we cannot know what this means.  What happened with Facebook and the
> > election is the canary in the coal mine (much bigger than a canary
> > though).  For those who don't know what happened not so good sources used
> > targeted advertising of Facebook, and my guess is Google as well, to
> > manipulate outcomes.  Targeted advertising is when you discuss a trip to
> > Bahamas in a gmail discussion and then the next time you log on to gmail
> > there is an advertisement for a hotel in the Bahamas. Up to now it has
> >been
> > freaky but not really dangerous.  There is not much discussion of exactly
> > what happened other than Russian (and my guess is other groups) used
> > targeted advertising.  A guess how that happened. People all over the
> > country were talking about Hillary Clinton's emails in the last few weeks
> > of the campaign. Facebook is able to aggregate the people who were
> >actually
> > talking about this on their Facebook pages. They are also able to locate
> > them according to region. Organizations then use this information to
> >target
> > people specifically in swing states with advertisements that are
> >disguised
> > as news items. So on Monday you write a comment, "I really wonder what is
> > going on with Hillary's emails" and on Tuesday you get a directed
> > advertisement with claims what is happening with Hillary's emails that
> > claims legitimacy. This is incredibly powerful.  Mark Zuckerberg the
> > founder of Facebook as said he won't allow this to happen again (at first
> > he denied it) but I'm not so sure how.  Targeted advertising is how
> > Facebook and Google make a lot of their money.
> >
> > I worry about the things academia.edu and researchgate.net might do
> (full
> > disclosure, I am on both because they are becoming the only way to reach
> > many fellow researchers). What happens when the funds that have been
> > feeding them money demand their profit?  Nobody would have predicted what
> > happened with targeted advertising. How will research dissemination be
> > manipulated?  I don't know what the solution to this is but we need to be
> > very careful.
> >
> > I question why universities did not step into the breach, to create Open
> > Educational Resources that were not beholden to profit. It's not like
> >they
> > didn't know this was coming and OER was a possibility.
> >
> >
> > Michael
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu [mailto:xmca-l-bounces@
> > mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of PERRET-CLERMONT Anne-Nelly
> > Sent: Sunday, October 08, 2017 9:20 AM
> > To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity <xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu>;
> > xmca-l@ucsd.edu
> > Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: Publishers seek removal of millions of papers from
> > ResearchGate
> >
> > Thanks for these very interesting links.
> >
> > The new political line of the Swiss National Research Foundation (SNSF)
> >on
> > these issues is very interesting:
> > "The results of research financed by public funds should be published
> > electronically so that they are freely and immediately available without
> > charge and can thus be reused by third parties, since they are considered
> > as a public good. In support of the principle of Open Access, the SNSF
> > expects grantees to make the results of the research projects it has
> > supported accessible to the public".
> > This will concern almost all scientists in Switzerland. See:
> >
> > http://www.snf.ch/en/theSNSF/research-policies/open-access/
> > Pages/default.as
> > px
> >
> > Anne-Nelly
> >
> >
> > Prof. em. Anne-Nelly Perret-Clermont
> > Institut de psychologie et éducation Faculté des lettres et sciences
> > humaines Université de Neuchâtel Espace L. Agassiz 1,  CH- 2000 Neuchâtel
> > (Switzerland) <http://www2.unine.ch/ipe/publications/anne_nelly_
> > perret_clermont>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Message d'origine-----
> > De : <xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu> on behalf of Alfredo Jornet Gil <
> > a.j.gil@iped.uio.no> Répondre à : "eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity" <
> > xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu> Date : dimanche, 8 octobre 2017 13:31 À : "
> > xmca-l@ucsd.edu" <xmca-l@ucsd.edu>, "eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity" <
> > xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu> Objet : [Xmca-l] Re: Publishers seek removal of
> > millions of
> > papers  from    ResearchGate
> >
> > That's a complex matter, Peter. Thanks for sharing. I wonder what the
> > views of others are. I am still forming mine, but would like to
> >contribute
> > with another resource to do so, an article from The Guardian on
> >profitable
> > business scientific publishing
> >
> > https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/jun/27/
> > profitable-business-scienti
> > fic-publishing-bad-for-science
> >
> > Alfredo
> > ________________________________________
> > From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu <xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu>
> > on behalf of Peter Smagorinsky <smago@uga.edu>
> > Sent: 07 October 2017 17:31
> > To: xmca-l@ucsd.edu
> > Subject: [Xmca-l] Publishers seek removal of millions of papers from
> > ResearchGate
> >
> > https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/publishers-seek-removal-
> > millions-
> > papers-researchgate
> >
> >
> >
> > Publishers seek removal of millions of papers from ResearchGate
> >
> > Academic social network accused of infringing copyright on a massive
> >scale
> >
> > Leading publishers are stepping up their fight against ResearchGate by
> > ordering the academic social network to take down papers that they say
> > infringe copyright.
> >
> > The move could see millions of articles removed from the site, as the
> > publishers say up to 40 per cent of papers on ResearchGate are
> >copyrighted.
> >
> > James Milne, a spokesman for the group of five academic publishers, which
> > includes Elsevier, Wiley and Brill, said that the first batch of
> >take-down
> > notices would be sent "imminently".
> >
> >
> >
> > "We're not doing this in any way against the researchers, we're doing
> >this
> > against ResearchGate," he told Times Higher Education. The site was
> > "clearly hosting and happily uploading material that they know they don't
> > have the license or copyrights" to, and was "refusing to work with us to
> > solve that problem", he added.
> >
> >
> >
> > According to a survey of academics released last year, Berlin-based
> > ResearchGate is by some way the world's biggest academic social network,
> > used by about 60 per cent of academics, particularly in the physical and
> > life sciences, and has raised nearly $90 million (£68 million) in funding
> > from investors, according to the website Crunchbase.
> >
> >
> >
> > Publishers are seeing "anecdotal" evidence that the availability of
> >papers
> > on the site is eating into their revenues, said Dr Milne. "We have heard
> > during the subscriptions renewal process that librarians are occasionally
> > referencing ResearchGate as an alternative to resubscribing to journals,"
> > he said.
> >
> >
> >
> > He attacked ResearchGate as being "backed by hundreds of millions of
> > dollars [from venture capitalists,] who are seeking to make a profit from
> > what [ResearchGate] do, which is upload copyright infringed material".
> >
> >
> >
> > "They put nothing back into the process for generating and validating and
> > curating all that material," he said.
> >
> >
> >
> > The publisher Elsevier drew a backlash from many academics in 2013 when
> >it
> > told users of Academia.edu, a rival to ResearchGate, to take down papers
> >to
> > which it had rights. Dr Milne stressed that this time, the publishers
> >would
> > not directly send take-down notices to academics. "We will work with
> > ResearchGate on this, not researchers," he said, although the
> >organisation
> > would be communicating "en masse" with academics about how they can share
> > their work properly.
> >
> >
> >
> > But for the publishers, sending out mass take-down notices is not a
> > permanent solution. "That in itself doesn't solve the problem, because
> > every day ResearchGate is uploading more and more material," said Dr
> >Milne,
> > trapping publishers in a "perpetual loop" of having to identify
> >infringing
> > papers. He argued that this would be confusing for researchers, as "one
> >day
> > there's content, and the next day there isn't", he said.
> >
> >
> >
> > Elsevier and the American Chemical Society are therefore also taking
> > ResearchGate to court where they hope to obtain a ruling that would stop
> > ResearchGate "scraping content off the web, uploading it...and asking
> > researchers to claim it" so that infringing material "is not in the
> >public
> > domain", he explained. The court claim would be lodged in Europe, he
> >said.
> >
> >
> >
> > A ResearchGate spokeswoman declined to comment. The company's founder and
> > chief executive, Ijad Madisch, has previously said that he "wouldn't
> >mind"
> > if copyrighted material was removed from the site, as researchers could
> > continue to share papers privately.
> >
> >
> >
> > david.matthews@timeshighereducation.com<mailto:david.matthews@
> > timeshighered
> > ucation.com>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>