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[Xmca-l] Fwd: KIBM Symposium Announcement: "Influence of Early Experience on Adult Brain Organization and Function"



Whether attending locally or via webcaste, this symposium ought to be of
considerable interest to these lists.
mike

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Jesse Robie <jrobie@ucsd.edu>
Date: Mon, Oct 31, 2016 at 10:50 AM
Subject: KIBM Symposium Announcement: "Influence of Early Experience on
Adult Brain Organization and Function"
To: talks@cogsci.ucsd.edu


To Whom It May Concern:

The Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind is pleased to announce our December
2, 2016 symposium, *Influence of Early Experience on Adult Brain
Organization and Function.  *Please include the following text and
accompanying poster image, below, in upcoming talks@cogsci.ucsd.edu
announcements.

Thank you!

Jesse Robie


Event Title: *Influence of Early Experience on Adult Brain Organization and
Function*
When: December 2, 2016, 1:00 - 5:30 pm
Location: Conrad T. Prebys Auditorium, Salk Institute
Registration: Admission is free but registration is required (see website)
Website: http://kibm.ucsd.edu/event/influence-early-experience-
adult-brain-organization-and-function
Webcast: A live webcast of this symposium will also available

The Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind (KIBM) invites you to attend *Influence
of Early Experience on Adult Brain Organization and Function, *a scientific
symposium on December 2, from 1:00-5:30, at the Conrad T. Prebys
Auditorium, Salk Institute.

Our panel of distinguished experts will explore how early experience
impacts adult brain structure and function, as well as to help clarify the
extent of this influence and the mechanisms by which developmental neuronal
plasticity affects the adult brain.  They will address additional questions
such as: How do events of early development show up in our behavior as we
age? What are the opportunities and risks during early development and
their consequences for adult behavior? Can the identification of windows of
“critical periods” in early development be used to reopen these windows at
later points in the lifetime to enhance or regenerate adult function?
The developmental origins of neurological and psychiatric disorders will
frame many of the issues being addressed in this symposium.

Presented by The Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind (KIBM).  Rusty Gage,
Salk Institute, and Nicholas Spitzer, UC San Diego, Co-Directors.

JPEG image