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[Xmca-l] Re: "English" as a school subject



My Scottish neighbour Rab is a builder, and when he showed up briefly on
our Australian home reno reality TV series "The Block" they put subtitles
up every time he spoke because his accent was so thick! My husband and I
were wishing that this facility was available in real life for our 'over
the fence' conversations! I understand completely David your feeling that
you should understand what is being said, but not having the foggiest idea
what is going on.

Sorry Peter, we seem to have derailed your thread...

In Australia, English is much as you describe (the tripod) and is
compulsory through to Year 12. However, in recent times (at least in the
state of Victoria), Year 11 & 12 students can now choose between
'mainstream' English (the tripod), Literature (mostly text analysis),
English Language (the 'science' of language and language acquisition) or
English as an Additional Language (for students with less than 7 years
instruction in English speaking schools - except in the case of indigenous
and hearing-impaired students) to meet this compulsory requirement.
All schools teach mainstream English, most would offer Literature and EAL
if they have enough students wanting to do them, but relatively few offer
English Language.

Cheers,
Helen

-- 
*Dr HELEN GRIMMETT *
Lecturer in Primary and Early Years Education
Professional Experience Liaison - Primary

*Education*
Monash University
Room 159, Building 902, Berwick Campus
100 Clyde Road
Berwick VIC 3806
Australia

T: +61 3 9904 7171
E: helen.grimmett@monash.edu <name.surname@monash.edu>
monash.edu

*Recent work:*
Helen Grimmett (2016): The Problem of “Just Tell Us”: Insights from Playing
with Poetic Inquiry and Dialogical Self Theory, *Studying Teacher Education*,
DOI: 10.1080/17425964.2016.1143810
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17425964.2016.1143810

Helen Grimmett (2014), The Practice of Teachers' Professional Development:
A Cultural-Historical Approach
<https://www.sensepublishers.com/catalogs/bookseries/professional-learning-1/the-practice-of-teachers-professional-development/>
,
Rotterdam: Sense Publishers




On 17 August 2016 at 08:51, David H Kirshner <dkirsh@lsu.edu> wrote:

> All I can figure is that the prosody of Gaelic and deeply Scottish-accent
> English is nearly identical.
> So, no code switching, just 3 guys having a conversation among themselves.
> It sounded like I should understand what they were saying, but I couldn't
> quite put the phonemes together into lexical items.
> David
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu [mailto:xmca-l-bounces@
> mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of FRANCIS J. SULLIVAN
> Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 3:05 PM
> To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: "English" as a school subject
>
> Wow, so were the code-switching? Should we coin the term "Gaelish" or
> "Englic"?
>
> Francis J. Sullivan, Ph.D.
> Associate Professor
> Department of Teaching and Learning
> College of Education
> Temple University
> Philadelphia, PA 19122
>
>
> Find out what any people will quietly submit to and you have the exact
> measure of the injustice and wrong which will be imposed on them.
>
>  Frederick Douglass
>
> On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 3:15 PM, David H Kirshner <dkirsh@lsu.edu> wrote:
>
> > Gaelic was brought from Ireland in the 5th and 6th centuries AD and
> > now is spoken mainly in western Scotland.
> > I was picked up hitchhiking in Scotland many years ago by three guys
> > in a Volkswagen, and could not tell for the duration of the 30 minute
> > drive whether they were conversing in English or Gaelic.
> > David
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu [mailto:xmca-l-bounces@
> > mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of FRANCIS J. SULLIVAN
> > Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 12:53 PM
> > To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> > Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: "English" as a school subject
> >
> > And isn't it also true that "Irish" (Is that the same as "Gaelic"?
> > What are the differences?) has mad a real comeback as a spoken
> > language among Irish citizens?
> >
> > Francis J. Sullivan, Ph.D.
> > Associate Professor
> > Department of Teaching and Learning
> > College of Education
> > Temple University
> > Philadelphia, PA 19122
> >
> > On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 8:33 AM, Stephen Walsh <stephenwals@gmail.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > HI Peter,
> > > e
> > > In Ireland all schoolchildren study 'Irish'.  It is compulsory form
> > > the beginning of primary education to the end of secondary education.
> > > If it would be helpful to have more detail I can put some more info
> > > together for you.
> > >
> > > Best regards,
> > > Stephen
> > >
> > > On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 11:24 AM, Peter Smagorinsky <smago@uga.edu>
> > wrote:
> > >
> > > > Hi, I'm writing mainly to my colleagues who are familiar with
> > > > public school, pre-university (what we call K-12 in the US)
> > > > education systems, with a question.
> > > >
> > > > In English-speaking nations, there is a school subject called
> "English"
> > > > that involves the study of literature (much from English-speaking
> > > authors,
> > > > rather than "world literature" which may have its own separate
> > > > course), writing (or now, multimodal composing), and language
> > > > study (of the
> > > English
> > > > language, often in the form of grammar instruction). This subject
> > > > is not ESL, EFL, TESOL, or other way of describing learning the
> > > > language of English by speakers of other languages.
> > > >
> > > > My question: I know that in Russia there are school subjects of
> > > > Russian literature and language; in the Netherlands there is the
> > following:
> > > > The Study Dutch Language & Literature (Dutch: Nederlandse Taal- en
> > > > Letterkunde) can be found at each Dutch university. Formerly you
> > > > studied linguistics and literature, from about 1975 a third
> > > > component was
> > > > introduced: Taalbeheersing (Dutch for language skills, especially
> > > > writing and argumentation). Nowadays the studies have new names,
> > > > like Dutch Language and culture
> > > >
> > > > Do other nations dedicate a school subject to this discipline
> > > (literature,
> > > > writing, language study in L1 and generally nationalistic in
> > curriculum)?
> > > > If so, what is it called, and what does it comprise?
> > > >
> > > > Thx,Peter
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>