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[Xmca-l] Re: "English" as a school subject



As someone who has always identified as an Irish American (no hyphen), I am
so glad to hear this. Thank you for responding.

Francis J. Sullivan, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Teaching and Learning
College of Education
Temple University
Philadelphia, PA 19122


Find out what any people will quietly submit to and you have the exact
measure of the injustice and wrong which will be imposed on them.

 Frederick Douglass

On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 2:08 PM, Stephen Walsh <stephenwals@gmail.com>
wrote:

> Hi Francis,
>
> Yes - Irish is doing ok.  My Irish is poor but my daughter is fluent.  She,
> and many people her age (she's a teenager), go to Irish language schools
> and that, in my view, has given the language a real boost.
>
> Stephen
>
> On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 6:52 PM, FRANCIS J. SULLIVAN <fsulliva@temple.edu>
> wrote:
>
> > And isn't it also true that "Irish" (Is that the same as "Gaelic"? What
> are
> > the differences?) has mad a real comeback as a spoken language among
> Irish
> > citizens?
> >
> > Francis J. Sullivan, Ph.D.
> > Associate Professor
> > Department of Teaching and Learning
> > College of Education
> > Temple University
> > Philadelphia, PA 19122
> >
> > On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 8:33 AM, Stephen Walsh <stephenwals@gmail.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > HI Peter,
> > > e
> > > In Ireland all schoolchildren study 'Irish'.  It is compulsory form the
> > > beginning of primary education to the end of secondary education.  If
> it
> > > would be helpful to have more detail I can put some more info together
> > for
> > > you.
> > >
> > > Best regards,
> > > Stephen
> > >
> > > On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 11:24 AM, Peter Smagorinsky <smago@uga.edu>
> > wrote:
> > >
> > > > Hi, I'm writing mainly to my colleagues who are familiar with public
> > > > school, pre-university (what we call K-12 in the US) education
> systems,
> > > > with a question.
> > > >
> > > > In English-speaking nations, there is a school subject called
> "English"
> > > > that involves the study of literature (much from English-speaking
> > > authors,
> > > > rather than "world literature" which may have its own separate
> course),
> > > > writing (or now, multimodal composing), and language study (of the
> > > English
> > > > language, often in the form of grammar instruction). This subject is
> > not
> > > > ESL, EFL, TESOL, or other way of describing learning the language of
> > > > English by speakers of other languages.
> > > >
> > > > My question: I know that in Russia there are school subjects of
> Russian
> > > > literature and language; in the Netherlands there is the following:
> > > > The Study Dutch Language & Literature (Dutch: Nederlandse Taal- en
> > > > Letterkunde) can be found at each Dutch university. Formerly you
> > studied
> > > > linguistics and literature, from about 1975 a third component was
> > > > introduced: Taalbeheersing (Dutch for language skills, especially
> > writing
> > > > and argumentation). Nowadays the studies have new names, like Dutch
> > > > Language and culture
> > > >
> > > > Do other nations dedicate a school subject to this discipline
> > > (literature,
> > > > writing, language study in L1 and generally nationalistic in
> > curriculum)?
> > > > If so, what is it called, and what does it comprise?
> > > >
> > > > Thx,Peter
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> >
>