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[Xmca-l] Re: Habits (Greek: ethos)



Well, here, for what it's worth, is the paper I mentioned (Annalisa
persuaded me that I probably wouldn't be breaking copyright as this forum
is for educational discussions!).  The paper has a narrow focus, on the
development of gratitude rather than on virtues or virtue ethics in
general, but it was very helpful to me to think of gratitude as a virtue,
developing in the way that Annas and other Aristotelians argue, rather than
simply as a positive emotion.

Cheers,

Jon


~~~~~~~~~~~

Jonathan Tudge

Professor
Office: 155 Stone

http://morethanthanks.wp.uncg.edu/

Mailing address:
248 Stone Building
Department of Human Development and Family Studies
PO Box 26170
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Greensboro, NC 27402-6170
USA

phone (336) 223-6181
fax   (336) 334-5076

http://www.uncg.edu/hdf/facultystaff/Tudge/Tudge.html


On Mon, Jul 11, 2016 at 6:59 PM, Christopher Schuck <
schuckthemonkey@gmail.com> wrote:

> This is already such a rich set of reflections on this new thread that it's
> hard to know where to jump in. I'm tempted to go all the way back to the
> beginning since that would feel less complicated, but maybe I'll pick up at
> the end since that's probably where people's heads are now. I just wanted
> to say quickly in reference to that Julia Annas book (which I really liked
> too), that not too long ago there was a book forum devoted to it in Journal
> of Value Inquiry: a brief precis of the book from Annas, three
> commentaries, and her response. A couple of the commentaries get into these
> developmental themes, and one person even discusses "affordances" (but
> interestingly, in terms of Ulrich Neisser's understanding of the
> "sophisticated unconscious"; not Gibson's version which Annalisa alluded
> to). I have no idea what the protocol is about attaching individual journal
> articles here as opposed to books -- let me know what is kosher for future
> reference -- but I would be happy to either attach some of them or send
> them to individuals.
>
> I also wanted to mention that at least among a certain group of theoretical
> psychologists (Division 24 of the APA where I have had some involvement),
> the Aristotelian paradigm is hugely popular and influential right now in
> debates over human morality and how to better integrate psychology with
> ethics. Often he is invoked there as a solution or at least counterweight
> to the problems surrounding the positive psychology movement (a big topic
> in that division). Also indirectly by way of Charles Taylor and Alasdair
> MacIntyre....He is almost always juxtaposed favorably with Plato as the one
> who actually "got it right." My impression is that he dovetails very well
> with cultural critiques of liberal individualism and narcissism in
> contemporary Western society (e.g. Lasch, Bellah, more recently William
> Deresiewicz), which I have been hearing a lot of lately. In that sense, he
> appeals to a certain traditionalist or anti-postmodern strain that
> emphasizes the importance of strengthening communities through shared
> practices and norms, and the role of deliberately cultivating moral
> development in resisting the tendency toward relativism. I think his
> scientific and practical sensibilities also appeal to those who are
> frustrated by the failures of contemporary philosophy to relate to
> real-world concerns and/or want to keep a place for rigorous scientific
> inquiry.
>
> I personally have had some issues with some of the more conservative
> implications of the Aristotelian worldview and how readily he might be
> co-opted by more conservative agendas, but of course that is just one of
> many ways to read him (and certainly not the only way that I read him
> either!). I think it's really important to try to bring him into the modern
> era and engage fully with our modern set of conditions and concerns, not
> just idealize his timeless ancient wisdom, wise as much of it may be.
>
> Chris
>
> On Mon, Jul 11, 2016 at 4:12 PM, Jonathan Tudge <jrtudge@uncg.edu> wrote:
>
> > Hi, Annalisa,
> >
> > I'm not sure that I'm able to distribute it to an entire online group,
> but
> > I'll send it to you via your personal email.
> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > Jon
> >
> >
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~
> >
> > Jonathan Tudge
> >
> > Professor
> > Office: 155 Stone
> >
> > http://morethanthanks.wp.uncg.edu/
> >
> > Mailing address:
> > 248 Stone Building
> > Department of Human Development and Family Studies
> > PO Box 26170
> > The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
> > Greensboro, NC 27402-6170
> > USA
> >
> > phone (336) 223-6181
> > fax   (336) 334-5076
> >
> > http://www.uncg.edu/hdf/facultystaff/Tudge/Tudge.html
> >
> >
> > On Mon, Jul 11, 2016 at 4:06 PM, Annalisa Aguilar <annalisa@unm.edu>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > Hi Jon,
> > >
> > >
> > > Thanks!
> > >
> > >
> > > Is there a chance of attaching the paper? I do not have access.
> > >
> > >
> > > Thanks,
> > >
> > >
> > > Annalisa
> > >
> > >
> >
>

Attachment: Tudge, Freitas, & O'Brien (2015).pdf
Description: Adobe PDF document