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[Xmca-l] Re: PDF Document Sociocultural and Feminist Theory_ Mutuality and Relevance.pdf



Greg, I’m so glad you enjoyed the panel. I wish I could have been there!
Angela and I are working on getting this manuscript to the publisher in a month, and hoping it will be out by the end of the year.
Here are the anticipated chapters:

Table of Contents


1.     Sociocultural and cultural-historical theories of learning: where have we been, where are we now? Indigo Esmonde (University of Toronto)
A historical and contemporary overview of the roots and current trends in sociocultural theories of learning. The emphasis is on highlighting the general themes, assumptions, and methodologies used by sociocultural learning researchers, and on the gaps in theory that make it difficult to fully address issues of power and oppression.

2.     Critical pedagogy. Shirin Vossoughi (Northwestern University) and Kris Gutierrez (University of California, Berkeley)

3.     Critical poststructural theory. Niral Shah (Michigan State University) and Zeus Leonardo (University of California, Berkeley)

4.     Queer theory. Jacob McWilliams (University of Colorado, Boulder) and William Penuel, (University of Colorado, Boulder).

5.     Indigenous worldviews. Megan Bang (University of Washington)


7.     Critical disability studies. Peter Smagorinsky (University of Georgia), Michael Cole (University of California, San Diego) and Lucia Braga


8.     Critical race theory. Eileen Parsons (University of North Carolina)

9.  Towards a critical, cultural, historical, theory of learning. Indigo Esmonde (University of Toronto) and Angela Booker (University of California, San Diego)

The chapters in the body of the book will each address a single theory from a critical tradition. These critical theory chapters will answer the following questions:
- What is this a theory of? What is it trying to explain? What is the (disciplinary) history of this theory?
- What are the key themes, assumptions, or conceptual frameworks of this theory?
- What methodologies are predominantly used?

  *   How does this theory interface with sociocultural/cultural-historical theories of learning? What points of connection are there? What disconnects are there? How would SCT have to change to take this theory into account? (How does SCT help the theory develop?)

All the best,
Indigo

--
Indigo Esmonde, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Graduate Studies, Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
GLITTER (Group for the study of Learning, Identity, and Teaching Towards Equitable Relations)
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
252 Bloor St W, Room 11-134
Toronto, ON
M5S 1V6
Phone: 416 978 0117
Fax: 416 926 4744
indigo.esmonde@utoronto.ca<mailto:indigo.esmonde@utoronto.ca>
http://indigoesmonde.blogspot.ca<http://indigoesmonde.blogspot.ca/>

From: Jacob McWilliams <jennamcjenna@gmail.com<mailto:jennamcjenna@gmail.com>>
Date: Tuesday, April 26, 2016 at 10:23 AM
To: "eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity" <xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu<mailto:xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu>>, Indigo Esmonde <indigo.esmonde@utoronto.ca<mailto:indigo.esmonde@utoronto.ca>>, Angela Booker <angelabooker@ad.ucsd.edu<mailto:angelabooker@ad.ucsd.edu>>
Subject: Re: [Xmca-l] Re: PDF Document Sociocultural and Feminist Theory_ Mutuality and Relevance.pdf

Thanks, Greg--it was nice to see you at the panel, and I'm glad the session felt interesting--and hopefully also useful.

The book is Power and Privilege in the Learning Sciences: Critical and Sociocultural Theories, and it's co-edited by Indigo Esmonde and Angela Booker (both cc'ed on this message). My chapter, co-written with Bill Penuel, is an argument for advancing queer theory in the learning sciences; other chapters focus on frameworks like Critical Race Theory, feminist theory, critical geography, critical technology studies, and so on.

It's a really exciting project, and one that I think is sorely needed.



--


Jacob McWilliams
Educational Psychology and Learning Sciences Program
University of Colorado Boulder
j.mcwilliams@colorado.edu<mailto:j.mcwilliams@colorado.edu>
http://www.jennamcwilliams.com


On Mon, Apr 25, 2016 at 8:39 PM, Greg Thompson <greg.a.thompson@gmail.com<mailto:greg.a.thompson@gmail.com>> wrote:
At AERA a few weeks back I saw a panel with Jacob McWilliams on it that was
dealing with these very issues that you mention here Mike as you quote and
"hear here" Phillip's comments.

The talks on the panel that Jacob was on were, as I understand it, chapters
of an upcoming book that will be edited by Angela Booker and ???. I fear
I've forgotten some of the details but I do remember the panel being one of
the best panels I attended at AERA this year.

Jacob, or perhaps someone else familiar with the book: could you fill in
the details here? Who is the co-editor (or co-editors)? What is the name of
the volume?

Any other details would be greatly appreciated (anticipated publication
date? Perhaps a list of authors if it isn't too premature).

Thanks,
greg


On Sun, Apr 24, 2016 at 4:23 PM, mike cole <mcole@ucsd.edu<mailto:mcole@ucsd.edu>> wrote:

> Hear hear, Phillip!
>
> Who wrote:
>
> i read this conclusion as a call for those scholars studying mind, culture
> and activity to actively collaborate with critical theorists, critical race
> theorist, queer theorists, so that, as Helena Worthem is advocating, our
> work can be closer to the bone of contemporary events.
> The editors of MCA, I think it is safe to say, will welcome first class
> articles that do exactly this.
>
> mike
>
>
> On Sun, Apr 24, 2016 at 3:01 PM, White, Phillip <
> Phillip.White@ucdenver.edu<mailto:Phillip.White@ucdenver.edu>>
> wrote:
>
> > greetings, everyone.  i can only image that the participants of xmca have
> > been waiting with baited breath to hear the results of my gefilte fish
> for
> > last friday's seder - and i can only repeat, so that you know that i'm
> not
> > fishing for compliments, that the gentleman in his late seventies who was
> > seated next to me (my son's mother-in-law's cousin's husband) said, "This
> > gefilte fish is better than my Kiev born grandmother, and she was a great
> > cook!"
> >
> > however, to join in the swim or current postings, Vera's conclusion is
> > quite to the point, so that i'm pasting it in here:
> >
> > "In the beginning of this chapter, I suggested that traditional
> > psychological and economic
> > models of human agents as lone, competitive actors are losing influence.
> > Increasingly, interdependence between persons is recognized as central to
> > individual and societal functioning. Both cultural-historical and
> feminist
> > theorists place the social sources of development, or "self-in-re1ation"
> as
> > central within their framework. There are shared themes and
> > complementarity, as well as different emphases across these two groups of
> > theorists. Feminists' concerns with developmental and relational dynamics
> > are not explicitly shared by scholars studying mind, culture and
> activity.
> > However, in looking for areas of mutuality , we broaden our ways of
> > knowing, and, in the process, may construct a new synthesis between
> thought
> > and motive, and cognition and emotion."
> >
> > i read this conclusion as a call for those scholars studying mind,
> culture
> > and activity to actively collaborate with critical theorists, critical
> race
> > theorist, queer theorists, so that, as Helena Worthem is advocating, our
> > work can be closer to the bone of contemporary events.
> >
> > phillip
> >
> >
>
>
> --
>
> It is the dilemma of psychology to deal as a natural science with an object
> that creates history. Ernst Boesch
>



--
Gregory A. Thompson, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Anthropology
880 Spencer W. Kimball Tower
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602
http://byu.academia.edu/GregoryThompson