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[Xmca-l] Re: Community Psychology



When I was at Yale, Greg, I was a rat psychologist and an assistant
professor. My work was not connected with the volunteer work we did in our
local community. I knew Seymour, and visited the clinic, but I was already
very distracted by the appearance of research in Africa to deal with -- a
seemingly unrelated set of professional concerns.

It was not until we began conducting research in New York that I made
intellectual contact with Seymor again. As the MCA articles indicate, he
been a central source of ideas for a great many people associated with LCHC.
mike

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 8:35 AM, Greg Thompson <greg.a.thompson@gmail.com>
wrote:

> Quick question for anyone who knows about ropes and tensile strength:
>
> Is the tensile strength of the rope greater than the sum of the tensile
> strength of each of the threads?
>
> I ask b.c. I've been talking holism a lot lately and have been looking for
> a good metaphor for the notion of "emergent properties".
>
> -greg
>
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 9:19 AM, mike cole <mcole@ucsd.edu> wrote:
>
> > I forgot about Inglod, Larry. Of course!
> > Can you pick out a parallel passage from his work.
> > The rope metaphor also has an interesting affinity to the use of the
> > pathways metaphor to describe ontogenetic development.
> >
> > mike
> >
> > On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 8:09 AM, Lplarry <lpscholar2@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > > Mike,
> > > This book seems to be focused specifically on the theme of the
> discussion
> > > as it is unfolding.
> > > Ingold's metaphor of rope as particular lines of carrying on together I
> > > read as questioning another metaphor of *totality* which carries on
> with
> > > notions of parts and wholes that articulate together or joint together
> > into
> > > a context of totality.
> > > The existence of these parts that exist as substance which joint
> together
> > > coincidently.
> > >
> > > The rope metaphor is challenging this nice packaged *totality* metaphor
> > > where the parts fit together or are articulated with nothing left out.
> > > Your question asking what exists as excess beyond the boundary marking
> > > (naming) of activity setting may be reflected upon as parts or lines of
> > > inquiry.
> > >
> > > Parts carrying on or travelling within totality/wholes
> > > Lines carrying on within ropes
> > > Larry
> > >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: "mike cole" <mcole@ucsd.edu>
> > > Sent: ‎2016-‎03-‎21 12:22 PM
> > > To: "eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity" <xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu>
> > > Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: Community Psychology
> > >
> > > Trying to follow through on each of the concepts, Cliff.
> > >
> > > In this connection, I notice that you use the term "activity setting"
> > which
> > > you attribute to Vygotsky. The book I took the McDermott materials from
> > is
> > > called "Understanding Practice: Perspectives on activity and context.
> In
> > > that book, in the discussions among authors, Engestrom is led to
> declare
> > > that "the activity is the context."
> > >
> > > So my mind is spinning around what an activity setting might refer to
> > over
> > > and above "activity." And then there is the question of how your use of
> > the
> > > term context and the word setting relate to each other. And all of this
> > is
> > > presumably closely linked to the discussion on text/context.
> > >
> > > Interesting to revisit old topics from new perspectives.
> > >
> > > mike
> > >
> > > On Sun, Mar 20, 2016 at 11:55 AM, Cliff O'Donnell <cliffo@hawaii.edu>
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > > > Thanks, Mike. Attached is the manuscript for my 2012 article with
> > Roland.
> > > > In it we discuss how we are using the concepts of context, culture,
> and
> > > > intersubjectivity.
> > > > Note that context is expressed in one of the goals of community
> > > psychology
> > > > by its professional organization,
> > > > the Society for Community Research and Action (SCRA):
> > > > ‘'to promote theory development and research that increases
> > > > our understanding of human behavior in context’'
> > > > (SCRA 2010 )."
> > > >
> > > > After discussing the many meanings of culture, we used the definition
> > as
> > > > the "shared meanings of people, developed through their history
> > > > and activities." Also in our discussion of intersubjectivity, we
> noted
> > > > "intersubjectivity does not imply uniformity. Diversity may be a
> shared
> > > > value,
> > > > agreement about process may allow frequent conflict, and there will
> > > always
> > > > be differences among people in their skills, thoughts, experience,
> and
> > > > emotions. In
> > > > addition, activity settings are dynamic; their characteristics are in
> > > flux
> > > > and, therefore, the intersubjectivity of their participants change
> over
> > > > time (O’Donnell et al.
> > > > 1993, p. 507)."
> > > >
> > > > Cliff
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > On Mar 20, 2016, at 8:26 AM, mike cole wrote:
> > > >
> > > > Alfredo's comments sent me looking for background material on the CC
> > side
> > > >> of Roland and Cliff's article.
> > > >>
> > > >> There is an article by Seymour as part of a special issue of MCA a
> > while
> > > >> ago. It seems not to have attraced the notice it deserves.Attached.
> > > >> Also attached is a recent summary of Community Psychology and
> > > Intervention
> > > >> research which seemed like promising background and perhaps a source
> > of
> > > >> additional ideas, since intervention is what so many us do
> > > professionally.
> > > >>
> > > >> Myself, I have been thinking about why Roland and Cliff identified
> > > >> secondary intersubjectivity as a key common principle.
> > > >>
> > > >> mike
> > > >>
> > > >> --
> > > >>
> > > >> It is the dilemma of psychology to deal as a natural science with an
> > > >> object
> > > >> that creates history. Ernst Boesch
> > > >> <Revisiting the Creating of Settings.pdf><communitypsych.pdf>
> > > >>
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > >
> > > It is the dilemma of psychology to deal as a natural science with an
> > object
> > > that creates history. Ernst Boesch
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> >
> > It is the dilemma of psychology to deal as a natural science with an
> object
> > that creates history. Ernst Boesch
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Gregory A. Thompson, Ph.D.
> Assistant Professor
> Department of Anthropology
> 880 Spencer W. Kimball Tower
> Brigham Young University
> Provo, UT 84602
> http://byu.academia.edu/GregoryThompson
>



-- 

It is the dilemma of psychology to deal as a natural science with an object
that creates history. Ernst Boesch