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[Xmca-l] Re: Congratulations Men



Erm, the chimera performing a sanctifying act, I meant to say.  V. nice.

Huw

On 9 November 2015 at 02:16, Huw Lloyd <huw.softdesigns@gmail.com> wrote:

> This one?
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelus_Novus
>
> I felt it was from Klee immediately, seeing a lion and phoenix chimera.  A
> good emblem for sure.  But, by the way, I was thinking predominantly one's
> own childhood as the idea with a bridge to the children now.  So, for the
> universally minded it is so.
>
> Huw
>
>
> On 9 November 2015 at 01:53, mike cole <mcole@ucsd.edu> wrote:
>
>> I was thinking about a children's day, too, Huw.
>>
>> When I was a kid, Nov. 11th was Armistice Day. Then it became Memorial
>> Day,
>> now it is Veterans day. Benjamin's picture of the Angel of History "to a
>> T"
>> as we
>> blokes say.
>>
>> Mike
>> PS- All is not gloom vis a vis Nov. 11th. It is the day I met my wife!
>> :-)
>>
>> On Sun, Nov 8, 2015 at 5:31 PM, Huw Lloyd <huw.softdesigns@gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>> > And, if I recall correctly, a sense of specialness of the day in
>> > conjunction with a community-wide collective activity (cleaning the
>> rooms,
>> > including moving heavy furniture to do so).
>> >
>> > Huw
>> >
>> > On 9 November 2015 at 01:21, Andy Blunden <ablunden@mira.net> wrote:
>> >
>> > > IN his book on teaching deaf/blind kids, A. Meshcheryakov says they
>> used
>> > > teh celebration of national holidays as a way of imparting a sense of
>> > time.
>> > > Andy
>> > > ------------------------------------------------------------
>> > > *Andy Blunden*
>> > > http://home.pacific.net.au/~andy/
>> > > On 9/11/2015 12:17 PM, Huw Lloyd wrote:
>> > >
>> > >> I don't know.  The best thing that I can think of that is consonant
>> with
>> > >> the media of 'a day' is the recognition of the cultural notion of
>> time.
>> > >>  Putting it in that context, is does seem the case that some of
>> > >> long-standing holy-days do implicate certain constants (relative to
>> our
>> > >> cultures and their histories), e.g. the equinoctes.
>> > >>
>> > >> Generally I have an aversion to such artifices as celebratory days,
>> but
>> > I
>> > >> think I might participate in something like a children's day, thereby
>> > >> encouraging some reflection on at least a generational timescale in
>> > >> contrast to the 24hour/5year media-politicking.
>> > >>
>> > >> Best,
>> > >> Huw
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >> On 9 November 2015 at 00:55, Andy Blunden <ablunden@mira.net
>> <mailto:
>> > >> ablunden@mira.net>> wrote:
>> > >>
>> > >>     I think the point is that holidays have *always* been
>> > >>     fixed to reinforce the normative order. The only
>> > >>     exception I know is May Day, which is not a holiday
>> > >>     here in Oz.
>> > >>     Andy
>> > >>     ------------------------------------------------------------
>> > >>     *Andy Blunden*
>> > >>     http://home.pacific.net.au/~andy/
>> > >>     <http://home.pacific.net.au/%7Eandy/>
>> > >>
>> > >>     On 9/11/2015 11:51 AM, mike cole wrote:
>> > >>
>> > >>         Dear Colleagues -Here is the latest word on
>> > >>         International Mens day and its
>> > >>         presence in the United States thanks to a hint
>> > >>         about checking Wikipedia:
>> > >>
>> > >>         https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Men%27s_Day.
>> > >>
>> > >>         Is it just me, or does anyone out there think that
>> > >>         some thought should be
>> > >>         giving to gender neutral holidays instead of the
>> > >>         normative order? For
>> > >>         example, how about a Parents Day and a
>> > >>         Grandparents day. With time off and
>> > >>         a little family time, whatever that family might be.
>> > >>
>> > >>         mike
>> > >>
>> > >>         On Sun, Nov 8, 2015 at 12:04 PM, Hans Knutagård
>> > >>         <hans.knutagard@ingressus.se
>> > >>         <mailto:hans.knutagard@ingressus.se>
>> > >>
>> > >>             wrote:
>> > >>             In Sweden we celebrate Fathers day evry year
>> > >>             the Sunday in November
>> > >>             between the 8 and 14. It started 1931 as a
>> > >>             respons to Mother's day in May
>> > >>             (in Sweden).
>> > >>
>> > >>                 8 nov. 2015 kl. 20:58 skrev Rauno Huttunen
>> > >>                 <rakahu@utu.fi <mailto:rakahu@utu.fi>>:
>> > >>
>> > >>                 Hello,
>> > >>
>> > >>                 In Finland it is Father's Day.
>> > >>
>> > >>                 Rauno Huttunen
>> > >>
>> > >>                 Lähetetty iPadista
>> > >>
>> > >>                     mike cole <mcole@ucsd.edu
>> > >>                     <mailto:mcole@ucsd.edu>> kirjoitti
>> > >>                     8.11.2015 kello 21.37:
>> > >>
>> > >>                     I have learned from my Russian
>> > >>                     colleagues that today is the
>> > >>
>> > >>             International
>> > >>
>> > >>                     Day honoring Men, which I am told is
>> > >>                     celebrated in 70 countries
>> > >>
>> > >>             including
>> > >>
>> > >>                     the US (Wikipedia so testifies). But I
>> > >>                     have never heard of it! Just me,
>> > >>
>> > >>             or
>> > >>
>> > >>                     is this
>> > >>                     not a generally recognized holiday in
>> > >>                     the U.S.?
>> > >>                     mike
>> > >>
>> > >>                     --
>> > >>
>> > >>                     It is the dilemma of psychology to
>> > >>                     deal as a natural science with an
>> > >>                     object that creates history. Ernst Boesch
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >
>> >
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> It is the dilemma of psychology to deal as a natural science with an
>> object that creates history. Ernst Boesch
>>
>
>