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[Xmca-l] Re: imagination and controlling the perception of visual illusions.



So it's filling the gap again!  :)

Martin

On Oct 1, 2015, at 1:16 PM, Huw Lloyd <huw.softdesigns@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 1 October 2015 at 19:13, Huw Lloyd <huw.softdesigns@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> 
>> 
>> On 1 October 2015 at 19:11, Martin John Packer <mpacker@uniandes.edu.co>
>> wrote:
>> 
>>> Huw,
>>> 
>>> Might this be an artifact of the digital encoding of the video?
>>> 
>>> Could you head to a tube station and try it with a real train?  :)
>>> 
>> 
>> I suspect you'd need strobe lighting.
>> 
>> Huw
>> 
> 
> E.g.
> 
> https://vimeo.com/116582567
> 
> 
> 
>> 
>> 
>>> 
>>> Martin
>>> 
>>> On Oct 1, 2015, at 10:21 AM, Huw Lloyd <huw.softdesigns@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> I came across this meme/advert on linkedin, which is an animation of a
>>> tube
>>>> train:
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>> https://buffer-pictures.s3.amazonaws.com/c2f41e8d32861d26bdecfc62f0d979e3.f009ceaeaf27dba4eb65f2ca247e9513.php
>>>> 
>>>> Ignoring the glib annotation, it did seem to be a little interesting to
>>>> discover if there was a reliable way to manipulate the perception of the
>>>> direction of the train.
>>>> 
>>>> Interestingly, this is something that I find I can do by imagining that
>>> I
>>>> can see an object within the train moving in the direction I wish, so
>>> that
>>>> perceived direction can be switched at will -- i.e. the perception of
>>> the
>>>> train can be shuttled back and forth.
>>>> 
>>>> I'm not sure whether conditioning of memories of living in London would
>>>> influence this (it is a London tube train).  Also, the speed at which
>>> the
>>>> train is going suggests its going away, because a train coming into a
>>>> platform would usually, I think, be going slower.
>>>> 
>>>> Best,
>>>> Huw
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>