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[Xmca-l] Re: Something to smile about



Annalisa,
I loved this. Thank you! 

A few days ago I listened to a podcast from All in the Mind from Australia’s Radio National titled “Horses and Healing”. Interestingly, the healing one associates with therapy animals goes both way in this podcast: Traumatized humans and traumatized animals co-construct each other’s healing. They are both subject and object to each other. 

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/allinthemind/horses-and-healing/6656388 <http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/allinthemind/horses-and-healing/6656388>

Almost daily, I walk the irrigation ditches in my neighborhood that have been part of the culture of the Rio Grande Valley “bosque” (riparian forest) for hundreds of years. The bosque harbors wildlife, including ducks. The other day I learned that some neighborhood boys, accompanied by an adult, killed several of the baby ducks. A huge red flag for the life trajectories of children is cruelty to animals. I wonder if anything has been done in socio-cultural studies on the subject/object issues between humans and animals? 

Henry
 
> On Sep 1, 2015, at 10:00 AM, mike cole <mcole@ucsd.edu> wrote:
> 
> Very thought provoking, Annalisa.
> mike
> 
> On Tue, Sep 1, 2015 at 8:34 AM, Annalisa Aguilar <annalisa@unm.edu> wrote:
> 
>> Greetings all,
>> 
>> 
>> Just in case you wondered if anything happy is happening in the world, I
>> thought to supply that wondering in the affirmative:
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> http://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2015/sep/01/gorilla-plays-peekaboo-toddler-columbus-zoo-video
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Kind regards,
>> 
>> 
>> Annalisa
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> 
> It is the dilemma of psychology to deal as a natural science with an
> object that creates history. Ernst Boesch