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[Xmca-l] Re: Fun &Games



Robert,
Great! “Fun” goes at least back to Middle English, and contrasts, for me, with “amusement” of French/Latin origin. I find that the choice of “fun” from Anglo-saxon, tribal, roots, as opposed to the “amusement” from the snootier French (probably explained by the domination of French in the higher reaches of culture of England during the centuries after the Norman invasion), tells a lot about what we mean by “fun” today. 
Henry

> On Aug 19, 2015, at 8:30 AM, Robert Lake <boblake@georgiasouthern.edu> wrote:
> 
> It is interesting (and fun) to look up word origins in the OED.
> which reveals a significant cultural/historically shaped evolution.
> See below.
> *Robert*
> 
> *Oxford English Dictionary*
> 
> *Etymology:*  probably < fun *v.*
> <http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/75468#eid3558958>
> 
> 
> 
> †*1.* A cheat or trick; a hoax, a practical joke.
> 
> 1699   B. E. *New Dict. Canting Crew*   *Fun*, a Cheat or slippery Trick.
> 
> 1719   in T. D'Urfey *Wit & Mirth* V. 259   A Hackney Coachman he did buy
> her, And was not this a very good Fun.
> 
> 
> 
> *2.*
> 
> 
> 
> *a.* Diversion, amusement, sport; also, boisterous jocularity or gaiety,
> drollery. Also, a source or cause of amusement or pleasure.(Johnson 1755
> stigmatizes it as ‘a low cant word’; in present use it is merely somewhat
> familiar.)
> 
> 1727   Swift *Misc. Epit. By-words*   Tho' he talk'd much of virtue, his
> head always run Upon something or other she found better fun.
> 
> 1749   H. Fielding *Tom Jones* III. ix. vi. 354   Partridge..was a great
> Lover of what is called Fun.
> 
> 1751   E. Moore *Gil Blas* Prol. sig. A3,   Don't mind me tho'— For all my
> Fun and Jokes.
> 
> 1767   H. Brooke *Fool of Quality* I. 99   Vindex..looked smilingly about
> him with much fun in his face.
> 
> *a*1774   A. Tucker *Light of Nature Pursued* (1777) III. iii. 10   It is
> fun to them to break off an ornament, or disfigure a statue.
> 
> 1790   R. Burns *Tam o' Shanter* in *Poems & Songs* (1968) II. 561   The
> mirth and fun grew fast and furious.
> 
> 1836   Dickens *Pickwick Papers* (1837) ii. 7   ‘What's the fun?’ said a
> rather tall thin young man.
> 
> 1845   S. C. Hall *Bk. Gems* 90   His wit and humour delightful, when it
> does not degenerate into ‘fun’.
> 
> 1849   E. E. Napier *Excursions Southern Afr.* II. 331   Being better
> mounted than the rest of his troop, [he] pushed on to see more of the fun.
> 
> 1887   M. Shearman *Athletics & Football* 325   Most footballers play for
> the fun and the fun alone.
> 
> 1889   J. K. Jerome *Idle Thoughts* 42   There is no fun in doing nothing
> when you have nothing to do.
> 
> 1891   S. Baring-Gould *In Troubadour-land* iv. 50,   I do not see the fun
> of going to hotels of the first class.
> 
> 1934   *Punch* 9 May 526/1   A Rector in an unapostolic fury is rather fun.
> 
> 1954   *Economist* 20 Mar.   His book has all the charm of science fiction;
> it is enormous fun.
> 
> 1958   *Listener* 25 Dec. 1085/1   The clothes were Jacobean, and fun to
> wear.
> 
> *(Hide quotations)*
> <http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/75467?rskey=SpD3uz&result=1&isAdvanced=false>
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> *b.* Phr. *to make fun of* , *poke fun at* (a person, etc.): to
> ridicule. *for or in
> fun* : as a joke, sportively, not seriously. *(he, it is) good, great fun* :
> a source of much amusement. *like fun*: energetically, very quickly,
> vigorously. *what fun!* how very amusing! *for the fun of the thing*: for
> amusement; *to have fun (with)* : to enjoy (a process); *spec.* to have
> sexual intercourse.
> 
> 1737   H. Walpole *Corr.* (1820) I. 17,   I can't help making fun of myself.
> 
> 1826   M. M. Sherwood *Lady of Manor* (ed. 2) IV. xxi. 247   Then you won't
> make fun of me, will you?
> 
> 1834   S. Smith *Sel. Lett. Major Jack Downing* ix. 24   They put their
> hats on and began to laugh like fun.
> 
> 1840   T. Hood *Up Rhine* 145   The American..in a dry way began to ‘poke
> his fun’ at the unfortunate traveller.
> 
> 1848   J. R. Lowell *Biglow Papers* 1st Ser. iv. 98   Stickin' together
> like fun.
> 
> 1848   E. C. Gaskell *Mary Barton* I. v. 73   Carsons' mill is blazing away
> like fun.
> 
> 1849   E. Bulwer-Lytton *Caxtons* I. i. iv. 29   You would be very sorry if
> your mamma was to..break it for fun.
> 
> 1857   T. Hughes *Tom Brown's School Days* ii. iii. 273   The bolts went to
> like fun.
> 
> 1860   T. P. Thompson *Audi Alteram Partem* III. cxxvi. 82   Who knows but
> Volunteer Rifles may make a campaign in the Holy Land, and mount guard over
> the production of the holy fire at Easter? ‘What fun!’
> 
> 1871   B. Jowett tr. Plato *Dialogues* I. 145   He may pretend in fun that
> he has a bad memory.
> 
> 1876   M. M. Grant *Sun-maid* I. iii. 104   The races are great fun.
> 
> 1877   *Independent* 19 July 15/2   Little Tad commissioned lieutenant by
> Stanton, ‘just for the fun of the thing’.
> 
> 1891   N. Gould *Double Event* 1   He's such good fun, and he's so obliging.
> 
> 1893   J. S. Farmer & W. E. Henley *Slang* III. 86/2   *To have* (or *do*) *a
> bit of fun*, to procure or enjoy the sexual favour.
> 
> 1895   H. A. Kennedy in *19th Cent.* Aug. 331,   I suppose the wood-carver
> was poking fun at him?
> 
> 1903   M. Beerbohm *Around Theatres* (1924) I. 425   Amateur mimes..go in
> for private theatricals..just for the fun of the thing.
> 
> 1958   *Times Lit. Suppl.* 7 Feb. 73/4   The clerks..get their own back by
> unmasking frauds and..having fun with the low standard of French commercial
> honesty.
> 
> 1961   M. Dickens *Heart of London* ii. 198   Ambrosia had pushed Edgar and
> the girl in there with the admonition to have some fun, dears.
> 
> *(Hide quotations)*
> <http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/75467?rskey=SpD3uz&result=1&isAdvanced=false>
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> *c.* Exciting goings-on. Also *fun and games*, freq. used ironically;
> *spec.* amatory play. *colloq.*
> 
> 1879   W. J. Barry *Up & Down* vii. 51   We..had a good passage to
> Hong-Kong. When we arrived, the first Chinese war with Britain had broken
> out, and there was every appearance of plenty of fun to be shortly had with
> the Chinkies.
> 
> 1897   *Daily News* 13 Sept. 7/1   The engineer officers who are engaged in
> carrying out some of the Sirdar's plans get much more than their fair share
> of ‘the fun’.
> 
> 1898   *Westm. Gaz.* 28 Oct. 3/1   It is possible that there may be rare
> fun by-and-by on the Nile.
> 
> 1920   ‘Sapper’ *Bull-dog Drummond* vi. 155   We've had lots of fun and
> games since I last saw you.
> 
> 1940   N. Mitford *Pigeon Pie* iii. 66   Farther on, however, you come to
> jolly fun and games—great notices.
> 
> 1948   E. Partridge *Dict. Forces' Slang* 78   *Fun and games*, any sort of
> brush with the enemy at sea.
> 
> 1948   ‘N. Shute’ *No Highway* iii. 70   ‘Fun and games,’ he said. ‘The
> boffin's going mad.’
> 
> 1952   E. Grierson *Reputation for Song* xxix. 260   Beneath the orderly
> conduct of her bar there was always present the possibility of ‘fun and
> games’.
> 
> 1954   C. Armstrong *Better to eat You* ii. 22   If it happened because
> somebody is having fun-and-games with Miss Sarah Shepherd, somebody is
> going to be sorry.
> 
> 1966   J. Porter *Sour Cream* v. 59,   I headed the car in the direction of
> the coast road. We had the usual fun and games with the local drivers.
> 
> 1970   *Globe & Mail (Toronto) *26 Sept. B3/3   Mr. Brown also expects the
> fun and games of tax haven subsidiaries to disappear with the new
> legislation.
> 
> 
> 
> On Wed, Aug 19, 2015 at 10:17 AM, Andrew Babson <ababson@umich.edu> wrote:
> 
>> Mike, first as an aside, I tried to post this earlier and it got rejected,
>> so, updating my contact info now. A sign I should get more active here?
>> 
>> Thanks for the great question, which is relevant to an approach
>> I am developing for analyzing interactional choices of young people. On
>> another level of analysis, we can think of the wide range of ideologies of
>> life course stages, specifically how certain kinds of play and fun are
>> expected of accepted at certain ages; and also how those ideologies are
>> different and similar culturally and historically.
>> 
>> For what I'm working on the first interactional level is more relevant
>> to class, culture and education and the latter about youth and culture
>> across the lifespan. The twain do meet in that we often think of
>> experimentation, dynamism, flexibility and freedom when we think of play
>> and also when we think of youth, whether referring to childhood or young
>> adulthood.
>> 
>> It's not a big step to consider where "fun" might fit in this conversation.
>> As an LSE anthro grad I can't also help but think of the relation of this
>> conversation to Maurice Bloch's work in Madagascar on the constitution of
>> the body and how it is expected to change through and after life, namely as
>> we get older we get bonier and therefore closer to the ancestors who are
>> physically only bone. It's interesting to think of how far we can or should
>> carry these analogic ideological constructions---the young spirit like
>> cartilage and the old spirit like bone---and how they relate to the above!
>> 
>> Andrew
>> 
>> ---------------
>> 
>> Andrew Babson, Ph.D.
>> Lecturer
>> Graduate School of Education
>> University of Pennsylvania
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Monday, August 17, 2015, mike cole <mcole@ucsd.edu> wrote:
>> 
>>> I have been led to wonder -- what is the relationship between having fun
>>> and playing.  How do they differ? Does their relationship, if they are
>> not
>>> reducible one to the other, change over the course of development? Odd
>> how
>>> the category of fun is absent from developmental discourse.
>>> Mike
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> --
>>> 
>>> It is the dilemma of psychology to deal as a natural science with an
>>> object that creates history. Ernst Boesch
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> --
>> sent from my phone
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Robert Lake  Ed.D.
> Associate Professor
> Social Foundations of Education
> Dept. of Curriculum, Foundations, and Reading
> Georgia Southern University
> Secretary/Treasurer-AERA- Paulo Freire Special Interest Group
> P. O. Box 8144
> Phone: (912) 478-0355
> Fax: (912) 478-5382
> Statesboro, GA  30460
> *He not busy being born is busy dying.*
> Bob Dylan (1964).