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[Xmca-l] Re: Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Alamagordo, Bikini. A reflective experience



The picture of the cake reminded me of this article that displays how
Hiroshima was picked up for destruction:
http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2015/08/hiroshima-nagasaki-atomic-bomb-anniversary/400448/
It reminded me of the notion of banality of evil. The phrase "the devil is
in the details" apply awfully here.
David


On Mon, Aug 10, 2015 at 8:31 PM, mike cole <mcole@ucsd.edu> wrote:

> While away this past week, I visited the Art Gallery of Toronto. Earlier in
> the day I had read through reflections about Hiroshima that followed my
> note on the subject of Aug 6/7. Recall that I had written
>
> "It seems worthwhile pausing for a minute to think about those bygone days
>
> when we humans were not as skilled at mass extinction as we are now.
>
>
> ​I was thinking about the two poems that David/Haydi posted while walking
> over to the museum. I had no idea of "an experience" I was to have that
> day.
>
>
> Attached are two paintings that were parts of exhibits at the museum. One
> room had some extremely valuable, classical paintings, among which was
> Ruben's "Massacre of the Innocents." The other was an exhibition of photos
> about the dawn of the age of atomic warfare, which contained many of the
> kinds of
>
> photographs members of xmca have had a chance to see thanks to the
> discussion. Those I was prepared for, but the photo attached along with the
> Reubens painting I was not prepared for. I attach them side by side.  The
> second one was a photo op created to assure worried US citizens that
> radiation was not a problem and/or as a demonstration of power, according
> to the explanatory text that accompanied it.
>
>
> The juxtaposition got me reflecting all over again. Maybe you will find it
> interesting.
> ​mike
> ​
> ​
>
>
>
>
> ​
> ​
>
>
> --
>
> It is the dilemma of psychology to deal as a natural science with an
> object that creates history. Ernst Boesch
>