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[Xmca-l] Re: Provocative song



I did not see this song as making a contrast between abstract and concrete
but between irrelevant and relevant school knowledge. Of course, none of us
would agree with the call to not stay at school. That is quite an
impractical choice, indeed.  I prefer to think of that hashtag as don't let
knowledge stay death at school and the song as a call to a more relevant
curriculum. Of course there is nothing new in it but the medium, may be.
Still that the message resonates with many says a lot about the awful state
of formal education these days.

On Monday, July 20, 2015, Lara Beaty <larabeaty@gmail.com> wrote:

> I would not venture a guess at what the musician’s initial intent was, but
> his explanations that emerged after overwhelming attention throughout the
> internet is an interesting development. As he said in the video Bill
> posted, there wouldn’t be a conversation if he titled the rap something
> less provocative. That at least one school has responded demonstrates both
> the possibility of individual and institutional development provoked by
> what might have just been viewed as yet another kid hating school.
>
> Best,
> Lara
>
>
>
>
> > On Jul 19, 2015, at 11:20 PM, David Kellogg <dkellogg60@gmail.com
> <javascript:;>> wrote:
> >
> > It’s really “The Tables Turned” again, isn’t it? Yet one of the most
> > practical things that a teenager can learn in school is the intimate way
> in
> > which knowledge that seems purely abstract is linked to everyday life.
> Like
> > “The Tables Turned”, the medium contradicts the message. The message is
> > really an appeal for the concrete, the particular, and the real against
> > knowledge which is abstract, general, and merely potential. And yet the
> > medium is—rap lyrics, Youtube and the internet.
> >
> >
> > Rap lyrics are full of abstractions. Just as an example,  the list of
> > “practical’ things we don’t learn in school that most purely abstract of
> > all concepts, human rights. Youtube is completely general—that is what
> > allows him to get tens of thousands of “likes” and reach millions of
> > people. And of course the programme he is pushing is mere potential, and
> > the internet is not real at all: there is no such place. In the end, what
> > he is really saying is just: "like this", "don't like that".
> >
> >
> > Meh. Feh.
> >
> >
> > David Kellogg
> >
> > On Mon, Jul 20, 2015 at 9:17 AM, Daniel Hyman <
> daniel.a.hyman.0@gmail.com <javascript:;>>
> > wrote:
> >
> >> For those with a fondness for text, and with all appropriate
> incantations
> >> to the gods of fair use:
> >>
> >> https://www.musixmatch.com/lyrics/Boyinaband/Don-t-Stay-in-School
> >>
> >> As someone who loves being educated (no quotes) on virtually any topic,
> but
> >> found the how-to knowledge offered to novice teachers (at least in New
> >> York), falling short of what a practicing educator needs to know, I can
> >> relate to the song's sense of painful unpreparedness, in my field. Not
> to
> >> the sense that public schools must (or in some domains can) teach how to
> >> make all personal moral choices, or that all subjects must be practical,
> >> e.g. being a bank customer (and no "impractical" subjects, e.g. math,
> >> underpin them), or that home life need not inculcate an interest in
> current
> >> events, history, or politics.
> >>
> >> So to me, the song is easy to reject at first, but on reflection...
> >>
> >> On Sun, Jul 19, 2015 at 7:54 PM, Bill Kerr <billkerr@gmail.com
> <javascript:;>> wrote:
> >>
> >>> Also,
> >>> Reacting to “Don’t Stay in School” hate comments
> <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJIu7pE0lBA>
> >>>
> >>> some of the core issues for discussion are identified there IMO
> >>>
> >>> Equal rights and democracy would have appeal to disempowered students
> but
> >>> how can abstract maths be made more interesting, a more difficult
> >> question.
> >>> It may not be possible to make some very important stuff more
> >> interesting.
> >>> Marx complained about having to study the "economic shit".
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> On Mon, Jul 20, 2015 at 9:11 AM, Lara Beaty <larabeaty@gmail.com
> <javascript:;>> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> And here’s an interesting follow-up:
> >>>> Holy crap, a school actually listened!
> <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCM4GEBDjz4>. Thanks for this link!
> >>>> Something to definitely use with my students to provoke a discussion.
> >>>>
> >>>> Best,
> >>>> Lara
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 6:28 PM, David Preiss <preiss.xmca@gmail.com
> <javascript:;>>
> >>> wrote:
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Dear colleagues,
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Some may like this song, some others hate it. It sounds to me like a
> >>>> worth
> >>>>> expression of many things going wrong with contenporary schools
> >>>> everywhere.
> >>>>> I am glad to see this coming from the younger generation as adult
> >> talk
> >>>>> about education scarcely listen what kids and young have to say about
> >>>> what
> >>>>> is being done to them at school. (I don't support the final statement
> >>> of
> >>>>> the song, of course; still find the message in the bottle quite on
> >>>> target).
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Boyinaband - Don't Stay in School (Sub Español)
> <https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=w3cyYMyj2QM>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> A bit of a renewed version of Pink Floyd's The Wall in a new genre.
> >>> For
> >>>>> those of you exploring new expresions, may be worth of your time.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> David
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>
> >>
>
>
>