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[Xmca-l] FW: Re: FW: Integrating Experiences: Body and Mind MovingBetween Contexts



Peter, 
Here is a life-line.
It is the notion of "retrospective teleology" in Merleau-ponty.
M-P writes, "Conception cannot precede execution" - expression.
before expression (the work itself) there is only a vague knowing/sensing, and ONLY the work itself, completed and understood, will PROVE that there was something (rather than nothing) to be FOUND there (in the work of art or conversation or ...)
Expression/execution within the work in other words REVEALS only retrospectively - or sends back - the meaning/sens that WAS the works tells.
M-P asserts that our lives and freedom are characterized in virtue of a retrospective teleology. When we express our lives we become that which is expressed, AND retrospectively our life makes Sens of all that we have been
He quotes " we must think of this freedom CONCRETELY, as a creative revival of ourselves)

Kym maclaren also compares retrospective teleology with Judith Butler's notion/concept of performativity, repeated in performance creates the ILLUSION that gender is the EFFECT (the in virtue of) of an ORIGINAL cause.
gadamer also speaks of the "work" in this way.
I hope this clarifies this way of "thinking"
Larry

-----Original Message-----
From: "Peter Smagorinsky" <smago@uga.edu>
Sent: ‎2015-‎05-‎18 12:13 PM
To: "eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity" <xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu>
Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: FW: Integrating Experiences: Body and Mind MovingBetween	Contexts

Larry, I'm drowning!

-----Original Message-----
From: xmca-l-bounces+smago=uga.edu@mailman.ucsd.edu [mailto:xmca-l-bounces+smago=uga.edu@mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of lpscholar2@gmail.com
Sent: Monday, May 18, 2015 2:16 PM
To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: FW: Integrating Experiences: Body and Mind Moving Between Contexts

Peter,

thanks for this heads up. 


I looked over the contributing authors and have a sense of “the river runs through THIS”.

Is this a tributary that partakes of the same “source” as CHAT. 

when we look back retrospectively and discover a telos in virtue of this tributary, how do we understand the “branching”. 

Is the cultural river “adaptive” assuming some genesis as blueprint within the river's source or is the river “discovered” after the fact?

 is the “branching” discovered retrospectively AS “a telos AS IF it came before the discovery.


The “river” and the “field” may be compatible metaphors of integrative synthesis?


in search of the strange animals that show whose names/concepts  start with the letter “z”


This book seems interesting






Sent from Windows Mail





From: Peter Smagorinsky
Sent: ‎Monday‎, ‎May‎ ‎18‎, ‎2015 ‎9‎:‎58‎ ‎AM
To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity





Book of possible interest to xmca-ers right after you finish reading the 6,000 articles shared in the last month.

From: Information Age Publishing [mailto:marketing@infoagepub.com]
Sent: Monday, May 18, 2015 12:43 PM
To: Peter Smagorinsky
Subject: Integrating Experiences: Body and Mind Moving Between Contexts

[News update from Information Age Publishing]

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Integrating Experiences<http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Integrating-Experiences>
Body and Mind Moving Between Contexts

Edited by:
Brady Wagoner, Aalborg University
Nandita Chaudhary, University of Delhi
Pernille Hviid, University of Copenhagen

A volume in Niels Bohr Professorship Lectures in Cultural Psychology

Cultural Psychology studies how persons and social-cultural worlds mutually constitute one another. It is premised on the idea that culture is within us-in every moment in which we live our human lives, in the meaningful worlds we have created ourselves. In this perspective, encounters with others fundamentally transform the way we understand ourselves. With the increase of globalization and multicultural exchanges, cultural psychology becomes the psychological science for the 21st century. No longer can we ignore questions about how our cultural traditions, practices, beliefs, artifacts and other people constitute how we approach, understand, imagine and remember the world. The Niels Bohr Professorship Lectures in Cultural Psychology series aims to highlight and develop new ideas that advance our understanding of these issues.

This second volume in the series features an address by Tania Zittoun and Alex Gillespie, which is followed by commentary chapters and their response to them. In their lecture, Zittoun and Gillespie propose a model of the relation between mind and society, specifically the way in which individuals develop and gain agency through society. They theorise and demonstrate a two-way interaction: bodies moving through society accumulate differentiated experiences, which become integrated at the level of mind, enabling psychological movement between experiences, which in turn mediates how people move through society. The model is illustrated with a longitudinal analysis of diaries written by a woman leading up to and through the Second World War. Commentators further elaborate on the issues of (1) context and history, (2) experience, time and movement, and (3) methodologies for cultural psychology.

CONTENTS:
Editors' Introduction: Cultural Psychology on the Move, Brady Wagoner, Nandita Chaudhary, and Pernille Hviid. PART I: THE NIELS BOHR PROFESSORSHIP LECTURE. Integrating Experiences: Body and Mind Moving Between Contexts, Tania Zittoun and Alex Gillespie. PART II: THINKING THROUGH CONTEXT AND HISTORY. On Context, Ivana Marková. A Strange Homecomer: "Integrating Experiences" in Alfred Schütz's Socio-Phenomenological Key, David Carré. Between History and Psychology: Steps Towards Interdisciplinarity, Jacob A. Belzen. The "Realness" of History: Ambivalence, Social Norms, and the Continuous Movement of Society, Aurora Pfefferkorn and Emily Abbey. PART III: EXPERIENCE, TIME, AND MOVEMENT. Experiences Which Integrate and Which are Integrated: Proust's Art of Life and van Gennep's Rites of Passage as Scenes for "Integrating Experiences" à la Zittoun and Gillespie, Paul Stenner. Experience as the Effort After Articulation, Antonia Larrain. Time in and for Development: Mind on the Move Between Multiple and Interdependent Temporal Experiences, Mariann Märtsin. Poetic Instants in Daily Life: Towards the Inclusion of Vertical Time in Cultural Psychology, Olga V. Lehmann. Moving as Conducting Everyday Life: Experiencing and Imagining for Teleogenetic Collaboration, Niklas A. Chimirri. PART IV: METHODOLOGY IN THE MAKING. The Diary as a Dialogical Space, Michèle Grossen. Positioning Ourselves Within Practices and Within the Human Condition, Jack Martin. Generalization is Possible Only From a Single Case (and Froma Single Instance): The Value of a Personal Diary, Jaan Valsiner. "I Am Not THAT KIND OF...": Personal Relating With Social Borders, Jensine Ingerslev Nedergaard, Jaan Valsiner, and Giuseppina Marsico. Body, Mind, and Movement: Some Proposals for Constructing a Socially Inclusive Psychology Based on Developmental and Cultural Principles, Tastuya Sato, Hideaki Kasuga, Mami Kanzaki, and Brady Wagoner. PART V: REPLY. Social and Psychological Movement: Weaving Individual Experience Into Society, Alex Gillespie and Tania
 Zittoun.



Information Age Publishing | P.O. Box 79049 | Charlotte, NC 28271-7047
T: 704.752.9125 | F: 704.752.9113 | E: info@infoagepub.com<mailto:info@infoagepub.com>


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