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[Xmca-l] Re: SSD and Perezhivanie



 Andy, do we need to think of pereshevanija in terms of units/events or in terms of patterns and tendencies? Could we say that to know a person is to have some idea of how a shared social environment is likely to be refracted by their perezhivenija (how we can expect them to respond to events, people and things)? Or would this be an overextension?

Rod

-----Original Message-----
From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu [mailto:xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of Andy Blunden
Sent: 21 March 2015 09:26
To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: SSD and Perezhivanie

Perezhivanija can be positive as well as negative, Rod.
As when you take a big personal risk, and it pays off.
Andy
------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Andy Blunden*
http://home.pacific.net.au/~andy/


Rod Parker-Rees wrote:
> I have trouble keeping up with all that burgeons here and I have just seen David's  comments on the (in)evitability of crises. Is it possible that Vygotsky had good environmental reasons for focusing on negative shifts in the SSD (he was writing in a particular socio-political environment) and that it might not be sacriligious to suggest that the continuing negotiation of the SSD also includes a lot of positive adjustments. In a similar vein I would prefer to extend (if it is an extension) perezhivanie to cover positive social experiences as well as traumas and crises but I tend to feel as though this will be seen by Vygotsky experts as a naively romantic oversimplification!
>
> I know this has been discussed in the past on this forum but I continue to be fascinated by the question of how scholarly study of what Vygotsky and others REALLY meant can be goaded and prodded by questions about what he might perhaps mean if he happened to be writing now. Is there another kind of SSD between the guardians of the truth of history and the bright young things who are inclined to be more playful with their interpretation of what can be done with ideas? And so there will be crises!
>
> Rod
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu [mailto:xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of Rod Parker-Rees
> Sent: 21 March 2015 09:04
> To: ablunden@mira.net; eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: SSD and Perezhivanie
>
> I find this short explanation of the SSD really helpful, Andy. This makes it more like a form of social affordance so not something which can be sliced into 'units' but more of a relationship BETWEEN a person and the social environment as experienced by that person. What makes it so rich is that the environment can meet itself coming back - but not quite itself, instead a version of itself transformed by the perezhivanie of the person who experiences it in a particular way and responds in a particular way. So in a conversation we learn about our friends by (often not consciously) noticing how our contributions are refracted by their perezhivanie.
>
> Clearly, in ontogeny, a variety of maturational changes (increasing mobility, increasing interest in other people's attention, increasing ability to 'read' social situations and increasing autonomy for example) will change the interactional space between child and caregivers and it is not surprising that caregivers are not always fully able to keep up, leading to 'crises' of varying degrees. How critical a crisis turns out to be is surely as much due to the caregiver's expectations and culture ('You WILL respect my authority!') as to the child's 'inner' state and the space between is negotiated and adjusted from both sides.
>
> All the best,
>
> Rod
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu [mailto:xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of Andy Blunden
> Sent: 21 March 2015 04:58
> To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: Resending LSV/ANL on crisis in ontogengy
>
> SSD is a term defined by Vygotsky in his study of Child Development in Volume 6 of the Collected Works.
> See https://www.marxists.org/archive/vygotsky/works/1934/problem-age.htm
> The SSD is a unique relationship between the (social) environment and the child, designated by normative cultural terms such as "school child"
> or "infgant" etc.
>
> Andy
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *Andy Blunden*
> http://home.pacific.net.au/~andy/
>
>
> Annalisa Aguilar wrote:
>
>> Thanks mike!
>>
>> I forgot to ask: Where does SSD derive? Did LSV use this?
>>
>> How does this differentiate from the environment? In other words, is the environment contained inside the social situation or vice versa? Or are they identical (equal)?
>>
>> Kind regards,
>>
>> Annalisa
>>
>>
>>
>> On Friday, March 20, 2015 10:37 PM, mike cole <mcole@ucsd.edu> wrote:
>>
>> SSD=Social situation of development.
>>
>> On Fri, Mar 20, 2015 at 8:24 PM, Annalisa Aguilar <annalisa@unm.edu> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>> Would someone be so kind as to unpack the acronym "SSD?"
>>>
>>> TQ,
>>>
>>> Annalisa
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>> --
>> It is the dilemma of psychology to deal as a natural science with an
>> object that creates history. Ernst Boesch.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
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