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[Xmca-l] Re: Every era seems to find the Neanderthal it needs.



Peeps,
And, at the risk of dwelling insufferably on this density thing (call me dense), I have to mention that I have been subbing today in classrooms of 6th graders here at Native American Community Academy in Albuquerque. (My retirement gig.) They’re all nutso, but one of the classes had 27, the rest only about 10. I spent all of my time in the densely populated classroom doing classroom management. The others I could actually enjoy the kiddos and engage them in a dialog about the topic: the ancient world, specifically of the Indian subcontinent. I am reminded of Mike’s article, Remembering the Future, in which he contrasts big Japanese and small American kindergartens. So, density is determining, but not determinant. Cultural psychology!
Henry


 
> On Feb 18, 2015, at 5:16 AM, Helen Harper <helen.harper@bigpond.com> wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> Hi Annalisa, 
> agreed. 
> 
> I was thinking about societies where I’ve worked and am a bit familiar with, such as those of the Australian central desert regions. They have been around for millennia, even though the landscape supports only numbers of people, and the population traditionally was spread very thinly over the landscape. But there’s no shortage of abstract thinking in those societies.
> 
> I guess the idea that societies get bigger and denser, and this correlates with the development of higher psychological processes - this struck me as being somewhat Euro-centric.
> 
> cheers,
> Helen
> 
> 
>> On 18 Feb 2015, at 1:48 pm, Annalisa Aguilar <annalisa@unm.edu> wrote:
>> 
>> Hi Helen!
>> 
>> Actually, in the context of this list, it is that higher psychological processes are developed socially. That was the reason that I posted it to the list! :)
>> 
>> It means that Vygotsky is getting out there!
>> 
>> Glad you enjoyed it!
>> 
>> Kind regards,
>> 
>> Annalisa
>> 
>> 
> 
>