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[Xmca-l] Re: Naoki Ueno passed away



Your memories have sparked a connection, Peg, that I had not made before.
The interconnectedness, from our perspective, of the work of our Japanese
colleagues.

For those who do not know the work of Yutaka Sayeki. In my next note I will
post the
paper he gave at ISCAR a few years ago.

Ueno's work out to be of interest to xmca members if they are not too
ploughed under.
Posted lchc link in prior message.
mike

On Sat, Jan 31, 2015 at 4:03 PM, Peg Griffin <Peg.Griffin@att.net> wrote:

> Thank you for letting us know about the loss of Naoki Ueno.  It is a deep
> loss for many of us.  He helped me so much to think about Sayeki-san's
> developing kobito theory and to recognize its power when studying
> mathematics and science learning.  I am quite sure that some of the kobitos
> that Ueno-san sent into the world during our problem solving talks remain
> active in my life events even today.
> Peg Griffin
>
> Peg Griffin, Ph. D.
> Washington, DC 20003
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu [mailto:
> xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of miyazaki kiyotaka
> Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 9:40 PM
> To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> Subject: [Xmca-l] Naoki Ueno passed away
>
> Dear All xMCAers,
>
> We have regrettably inform you that Naoki Ueno, one of the most active and
> influential researchers in Japanese activity theory, has passed away on
> 27th January because of pancreas cancer.  As we in Japan didn’t have any
> information on his health problem, the news was a big surprise for us. He
> had been the militant critique of the cognitivism since his graduate
> student days. It was after his return from sabbatical stay at LCHC in 1989,
> however, that his work became very productive and influential in Japan. He
> introduced the ideas of situated approach to Japan, and shocked us. He has
> remained at the front of the activity theory research and stimulating us
> not only in Japan but also internationally until his young death at 64. As
> he has many friends and comrades internationally, we tell all of you this
> sad news in xmca network.
>
> Kiyotaka Miyazaki
> Waseda University,
> Japan.
>
>
>


-- 
It is the dilemma of psychology to deal as a natural science with an object
that creates history. Ernst Boesch.