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[Xmca-l] Re: Chomsky, Vygotsky, and phenomenology



He also wasn't concerned about culture but universal grammar rules.

On December 17, 2014, at 5:49 AM, Carol Macdonald <carolmacdon@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi

I do know that Chomsky and Piaget are diametrically opposed (I wrote a lot
about that long ago). But Vygotsky vs Chomsky I have given less thought
to.  The real sticking point is the specificity of the language that
Chomsky posits. But remember Chomsky was working with a narrow palette.  He
knew nothing about psychology at all in the 60's. And he probably thought
he didn't have to. As for our symbolic capacities, it seems he didn't give
it any thought.  He was also working in a vacuum when he talked about the
development of language - he thought we had a very impoverished input from
others. And we know now that that is absolutely not the case: Children get
a very rich input from their caregivers. So perhaps we should not really be
giving Chomsky much of a platform on XMCA.

Carol

On 16 December 2014 at 21:38, Dr. Paul C. Mocombe <pmocombe@mocombeian.com>
wrote:
>
> I do not want people to come down on...thinking out loud about another way
> to resolve the controversy between chomskyianites and vygotskyites...i
> think it can be done through phenomenology (arrogance of youth maybe, but I
> am going to try it)....
>
>
> Dr. Paul C. Mocombe
> President
> The Mocombeian Foundation, Inc.
> www.mocombeian.com
> www.readingroomcurriculum.com
> www.paulcmocombe.info
>
> <div>-------- Original message --------</div><div>From: "Dr. Paul C.
> Mocombe" <pmocombe@mocombeian.com> </div><div>Date:12/16/2014  2:01 PM
> (GMT-05:00) </div><div>To: "eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity" <
> xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu> </div><div>Subject: [Xmca-l]  Chomsky,
> Vygotsky,  and phenomenology </div><div>
> </div>Is it really the case thay chomsky and Vygotsky diametrically oppose
> one another?  As I read Vygotsky it appears as if something is missing.
> That something for me was the internalization process.  I was reading his
> concept of internalization as though he was suggesting that it took place
> among an empiricist view of the human being as a "blank slate."  hence my
> questions in the previous thread.  If chomsky is right, which I think he is
> to some extent, does that change Vygotsky or can we synthesize the two?
> I am working on a paper to attempt to do just that through
> phenomenology....
>
> Dr. Paul C. Mocombe
> President
> The Mocombeian Foundation, Inc.
> www.mocombeian.com
> www.readingroomcurriculum.com
> www.paulcmocombe.info
>


-- 
Carol A  Macdonald Ph D (Edin)
Developmental psycholinguist
Academic, Researcher,  and Editor
Honorary Research Fellow: Department of Linguistics, Unisa