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[Xmca-l] Re: Sociocritical Literacies and more context



Francine,

Yes, there is variation in the definitions. The stance I had in mind was an
indigenous one like the one articulated by Peter.

Aria

-----Original Message-----
From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu
[mailto:xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of larry smolucha
Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2015 3:20 PM
To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: Sociocritical Literacies and more context

Message from Francine:

Aria,

I appreciate your definition of decolonialism, but when I look om the
internet I find the term used different ways.



> From: arazfar@uic.edu
> To: xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu
> Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2015 13:21:34 -0600
> Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: Sociocritical Literacies and more context
> 
> Francine,
> 
> "Postcolonialism" and "Orientalism" definitely demonize the West, and 
> self proclaimed "subalterns" do all the speaking and the "West" does 
> all the listening. Decolonialism is the realization that this stance 
> might have been necessary but it clearly isn't sufficient. The cases 
> you mention illustrate that, where so-called "oppressed" become 
> oppressors themselves. I am espousing continued two-way communication 
> and dialectic interaction on more symmetrical grounds. There is no 
> need to undermine "the West" or "save the East" or vice versa. I am 
> imagining the outcome of "going East" for the "Western" intellectual 
> the emergence of a West that see itself as East, and an East that sees 
> itself as West otherwise it is perpetual antagonism and "culture wars" 
> as you describe. I'm not sure about your characterization of the roots of
the internet.
> 
> Aria   
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu
> [mailto:xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of larry smolucha
> Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2015 12:46 PM
> To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: Sociocritical Literacies and more context
> 
> Message from Francine:
> 
> How can you have a dialectic or a discourse with the 'other'
> (i.e. the so-called Western intellectual) when the rhetoric of 
> postcolonialism, decolonialism, and  Orientalism demonizes the West?
> At the very same time, that ISIL, el Shabbab, Boko Haram, are the 
> oppressors massacring thousands of Christians and Muslims, - and it is 
> the West that has to intervene to save these innocent lives.
> 
> You are espousing a one way communication in which self-labeled 
> subalterns want to do all the speaking, and have the people they have 
> designated as their oppressors do all the listening.
> 
> There is also the irony, that the internet is a product of Western 
> technology
> - wasn't the world wide web designed by the U.S. military? If it is 
> O.K. to use  Western 'tools' to undermine the West , then this is not 
> decolonialism but merely culture wars.
> 
> 
> 
> > From: arazfar@uic.edu
> > To: xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu
> > Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2015 11:44:30 -0600
> > Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: Sociocritical Literacies and more context
> > 
> > Greg and Annalisa,
> > 
> > The question you raise, and a point made earlier by Peter, seems to 
> > me the outcome of post-colonial literature. This is why there is a 
> > need for the "Western intellectual" to "go East." This was the 
> > conclusion of Edward Said's "Orientalism" and other post-colonial 
> > theorists. Since the time of Napoleon, the "Western intellectual" 
> > had been going east, engaged in "subaltern studies" for the purpose of
conquest and cultural domination.
> > He/She must now "go East" to hear/listen to the "other" in order to
> reclaim
> > its self and embrace a pedagogy of "decolonization." If the "Western 
> > intellectual" is the oppressor, then "going East" to "hear" is 
> > his/her pedagogy. I believe this was at the at the heart of Freire's 
> > "Pedagogy of the Oppressed" as well. A pedagogy that is just as 
> > "critical" and
> liberatory
> > for the so called "oppressor" as it is for the so called 
> > "oppressed." This is a dialectic missing in today's critical, ethnic,
and "subaltern"
> studies
> > programs.   
> > 
> > Aria    
> > 
> > Aria Razfar, Ph.D.
> > Associate Professor of Literacy, Language, and Culture Director of 
> > Graduate Studies, Curriculum and Instruction University of Illinois 
> > at Chicago
> > 1040 W. Harrison St. M/C 147
> > Chicago, IL, 60607
> > 
> > Director of English Learning through Mathematics, Science and Action 
> > Research (ELMSA) www.elmsa.org
> > 
> > Webpage: http://education.uic.edu/personnel/faculty/aria-razfar-phd
> > Tel: 312-413-8373
> > Fax: 312-996-8134
> > 
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu 
> > [mailto:xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of Annalisa 
> > Aguilar
> > Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2015 11:02 AM
> > To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> > Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: Sociocritical Literacies and more context
> > 
> > Hi Greg,
> > 
> > You know, I think you are on to something there. 
> > 
> > As long as there isn't a subsequent Oppression of the Pedagogy of 
> > the Oppressors, I think it could work!
> > 
> > Kind regards,
> > 
> > Annalisa
> > 
> > 
> > On Jan 3, 2015 9:21 AM,  Greg Thompson <greg.a.thompson@gmail.com>
wrote:
> > 
> > Seems to me that Spivak's "Can the subaltern speak?" is just as much 
> > a question of "Can the Western intellectual hear/listen?"
> > 
> > Makes me wonder about articulating a Pedagogy of the Oppressors.
> > 
> > -greg
> > 
> > 
> > 
>  		 	   		  
>