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[Xmca-l] Re: Sociocritical Literacies and more context



Message from Francine:

How can you have a dialectic or a discourse with the 'other'
(i.e. the so-called Western intellectual) when the rhetoric of 
postcolonialism, decolonialism, and  Orientalism demonizes the West?
At the very same time, that ISIL, el Shabbab, Boko Haram, are the oppressors
massacring thousands of Christians and Muslims, - and it is the West that
has to intervene to save these innocent lives. 

You are espousing a one way communication in which self-labeled subalterns
want to do all the speaking, and have the people they have designated as their
oppressors do all the listening. 

There is also the irony, that the internet is a product of Western technology
- wasn't the world wide web designed by the U.S. military? If it is O.K. to use 
 Western 'tools' to undermine the West , then this is not decolonialism but
merely culture wars.



> From: arazfar@uic.edu
> To: xmca-l@mailman.ucsd.edu
> Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2015 11:44:30 -0600
> Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: Sociocritical Literacies and more context
> 
> Greg and Annalisa,
> 
> The question you raise, and a point made earlier by Peter, seems to me the
> outcome of post-colonial literature. This is why there is a need for the
> "Western intellectual" to "go East." This was the conclusion of Edward
> Said's "Orientalism" and other post-colonial theorists. Since the time of
> Napoleon, the "Western intellectual" had been going east, engaged in
> "subaltern studies" for the purpose of conquest and cultural domination.
> He/She must now "go East" to hear/listen to the "other" in order to reclaim
> its self and embrace a pedagogy of "decolonization." If the "Western
> intellectual" is the oppressor, then "going East" to "hear" is his/her
> pedagogy. I believe this was at the at the heart of Freire's "Pedagogy of
> the Oppressed" as well. A pedagogy that is just as "critical" and liberatory
> for the so called "oppressor" as it is for the so called "oppressed." This
> is a dialectic missing in today's critical, ethnic, and "subaltern" studies
> programs.   
> 
> Aria    
> 
> Aria Razfar, Ph.D.
> Associate Professor of Literacy, Language, and Culture
> Director of Graduate Studies, Curriculum and Instruction
> University of Illinois at Chicago
> 1040 W. Harrison St. M/C 147
> Chicago, IL, 60607
> 
> Director of English Learning through Mathematics, Science and Action
> Research (ELMSA)
> www.elmsa.org
> 
> Webpage: http://education.uic.edu/personnel/faculty/aria-razfar-phd
> Tel: 312-413-8373
> Fax: 312-996-8134
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu
> [mailto:xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of Annalisa Aguilar
> Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2015 11:02 AM
> To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: Sociocritical Literacies and more context
> 
> Hi Greg,
> 
> You know, I think you are on to something there. 
> 
> As long as there isn't a subsequent Oppression of the Pedagogy of the
> Oppressors, I think it could work!
> 
> Kind regards,
> 
> Annalisa
> 
> 
> On Jan 3, 2015 9:21 AM,  Greg Thompson <greg.a.thompson@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> Seems to me that Spivak's "Can the subaltern speak?" is just as much a
> question of "Can the Western intellectual hear/listen?"
> 
> Makes me wonder about articulating a Pedagogy of the Oppressors.
> 
> -greg
> 
> 
>