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[Xmca-l] Re: classroom videos



Remi, Adam, Martin & Ed,

Thanks for all these links, which I'm starting to step through.

I think the points Ed raises are rather significant ones.  Access to
quality data can transform a field of research.

Huw



On 4 December 2014 at 22:34, Ed Wall <ewall@umich.edu> wrote:

>      Both Deborah Ball and Maggie Lampert at UM (same year, different
> grades) created a huge collection. I don't think Maggie will let you a have
> access to hers although you might be able to view it in person ( I guess
> you could ask Tim Boerst to see what he says - tboerst@umich.edu);
> however, it may be possible if you contact Kara Suzuki( ksuzuka@umich.edu
> )- as she manages the interface for Deborah Ball's collection - that you
> would be allowed to access, with some substantial constraints, Deborah's
> collection. Also Ruth Heaton taught the same year as Maggie and Deborah a
> grad student and she wrote up her experience (I think there were some
> consecutive lessons in her book ('Teaching Mathematics to the New
> Standards). There was a large project in the Netherlands to do video work
> also, but I believe it has been discontinued. Perhaps some of the people at
> the Freudenthal Institute would have information.
>      The UM has also put on line what is termed the Teaching & Learning
> Exploratory (https://tle.soe.umich.edu/) which does have a large number
> of classroom lessons (but I don't think any consecutive; however, I've
> never checked). Again, there are constraints that you would need to observe
> and not being able to  use the lessons for research purposes is one of the
> usual.
>
>      In any case,as I indicated, it is somewhat unlikely that anyone would
> give you access - because of the human subjects business - without some
> substantial constraints. I would suggest that you find somebody that is
> doing a study and become a member of the research team or, as a number of
> persons at UM, do doctoral work under someone who has such a database.
>
>      I know that if and how giving people access to such video for
> research purposes is an ongoing debate.
>
> Ed
>
> On Dec 4, 2014, at  3:35 PM, Martin John Packer wrote:
>
> > Maggie Lambert at U Michigan created a huge database of videos (and
> more) of her own math instruction, if I remember correctly.
> >
> > Martin
> >
> > On Dec 4, 2014, at 4:30 PM, Rémi A. van Compernolle <
> compernolle@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >> you might check out http://talkbank.org/
> >>
> >> there’s a lot of stuff there - not sure about consecutive lessons in
> math though.
> >>
> >> adam
> >>
> >>
> >> Rémi A. van Compernolle
> >> Assistant Professor of Second Language Acquisition & French and
> Francophone Studies
> >> Department of Modern Languages
> >> Carnegie Mellon University
> >> Baker Hall A60M
> >> 412-268-1122
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> On Dec 4, 2014, at 4:22 PM, Huw Lloyd <huw.softdesigns@gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>
> >>> Folks,
> >>>
> >>> I'm searching for classroom videos that record consecutive lessons
> >>> (preferably maths) for the same class (or group).
> >>>
> >>> Searching databases and online for videos with this kind of specificity
> >>> seems to be rather problematic.
> >>>
> >>> So far, I've uncovered this link, which has numerous videos of single
> >>> lessons.
> >>>
> >>> https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teachers-tv/teachers-tv
> >>>
> >>> If anyone here has some leads, it'd be good to hear them.
> >>>
> >>> Thanks,
> >>> Huw
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
>