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[Xmca-l] Re: classroom videos



I just remembered (I was thinking of school based classes in the previous email) that you may be able to get access to the real thing (and again some constrained use of video) by observing a summer class taught by Deborah Ball at the UM (I assume it will be taught again this year) where she does two weeks of a mathematics class (usually going into 5th) with struggling students. You get to watch, look at the video, and talk with her and others (smile). 

Ed

On Dec 4, 2014, at  4:34 PM, Ed Wall wrote:

>     Both Deborah Ball and Maggie Lampert at UM (same year, different grades) created a huge collection. I don't think Maggie will let you a have access to hers although you might be able to view it in person ( I guess you could ask Tim Boerst to see what he says - tboerst@umich.edu); however, it may be possible if you contact Kara Suzuki( ksuzuka@umich.edu )- as she manages the interface for Deborah Ball's collection - that you would be allowed to access, with some substantial constraints, Deborah's collection. Also Ruth Heaton taught the same year as Maggie and Deborah a grad student and she wrote up her experience (I think there were some consecutive lessons in her book ('Teaching Mathematics to the New Standards). There was a large project in the Netherlands to do video work also, but I believe it has been discontinued. Perhaps some of the people at the Freudenthal Institute would have information.
>     The UM has also put on line what is termed the Teaching & Learning Exploratory (https://tle.soe.umich.edu/) which does have a large number of classroom lessons (but I don't think any consecutive; however, I've never checked). Again, there are constraints that you would need to observe and not being able to  use the lessons for research purposes is one of the usual.
> 
>     In any case,as I indicated, it is somewhat unlikely that anyone would give you access - because of the human subjects business - without some substantial constraints. I would suggest that you find somebody that is doing a study and become a member of the research team or, as a number of persons at UM, do doctoral work under someone who has such a database.
> 
>     I know that if and how giving people access to such video for research purposes is an ongoing debate.
> 
> Ed
> 
> On Dec 4, 2014, at  3:35 PM, Martin John Packer wrote:
> 
>> Maggie Lambert at U Michigan created a huge database of videos (and more) of her own math instruction, if I remember correctly.
>> 
>> Martin
>> 
>> On Dec 4, 2014, at 4:30 PM, Rémi A. van Compernolle <compernolle@gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>>> you might check out http://talkbank.org/
>>> 
>>> there’s a lot of stuff there - not sure about consecutive lessons in math though.
>>> 
>>> adam
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Rémi A. van Compernolle
>>> Assistant Professor of Second Language Acquisition & French and Francophone Studies
>>> Department of Modern Languages
>>> Carnegie Mellon University
>>> Baker Hall A60M
>>> 412-268-1122
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> On Dec 4, 2014, at 4:22 PM, Huw Lloyd <huw.softdesigns@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> Folks,
>>>> 
>>>> I'm searching for classroom videos that record consecutive lessons
>>>> (preferably maths) for the same class (or group).
>>>> 
>>>> Searching databases and online for videos with this kind of specificity
>>>> seems to be rather problematic.
>>>> 
>>>> So far, I've uncovered this link, which has numerous videos of single
>>>> lessons.
>>>> 
>>>> https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teachers-tv/teachers-tv
>>>> 
>>>> If anyone here has some leads, it'd be good to hear them.
>>>> 
>>>> Thanks,
>>>> Huw
>>> 
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>