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[Xmca-l] Re: Zoya Kosmodemyanskaya



I understand your point.

After the decision to go to the front, she seems to have reached an
equilibrium, and she was ready for death. But;
prior to this decision, it seems that she was, as a child, from even ages
like 10 or 11, in a constant search for something. This something, I think,
is to be a person of highest ideals, a devotion to these ideals. It was
defense of Soviet Union after the war broke out. Prior to this, I think she
was not in a state of equilibrium.

Best,
Ulvi


2014-12-01 22:26 GMT+02:00 Annalisa Aguilar <annalisa@unm.edu>:

>
> Hi Ulvi,
>
> I would say that the preconditions are self-acceptance, which is my reason
> for mentioning cows and cats. Of course cows and cats are not
> self-conscious so I was being a little ironic to say that we could evolve
> to their state. More to your point, it is because we don't accept ourselves
> as we are that causes unhappiness. So to be more precise about how to think
> of it is to consider the removal of non-self-acceptance rather than an
> addition of self-acceptance, because as infants and children we accept
> ourselves just fine! Why are children so happy?
>
> Zoya seems to have accepted herself as herself, living in her present
> moment, living to the task at hand as was necessary. It is my belief the
> reason why she was able to face her death so fearlessly, and why she was so
> remarkable to the people around her while she lived.
>
> I would not call being in the present moment idealistic, but realistic. :)
>
> Kind regards,
>
> Annalisa
>
> ________________________________________
> From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu <xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu>
> on behalf of Ulvi İçil <ulvi.icil@gmail.com>
> Sent: Monday, December 1, 2014 4:04 AM
> To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: Zoya Kosmodemyanskaya
>
> Thank you Annalisa.
>
> You are right. There is certainly many many happinnesses.
>
> But the question was: One big, common happiness for all. Is there such
> happiness?
>
> Anf if there is, what are its preconditions?
>
> Kind regards,
>
> Ulvi
>
>
> 2014-12-01 10:41 GMT+02:00 Annalisa Aguilar <annalisa@unm.edu>:
>
> > Dear Ulvi,
> >
> > I think it absolutely depends on what you mean by happiness!  :)
> >
> > But to Zoya, it seems that she became the person she became from the deep
> > reading she did. I'm sure writing in a notebook is a part of that as
> well.
> > I suspect in the backdrop of her hard life, these past-times were
> essential
> > to her development, especially concerning her imagination.
> >
> > Have you noticed how cows are not bothered if they have matching horns or
> > crooked horns? Or cats do not complain that their silly acrobatics are
> > posted on the internet?
> >
> > If we evolve to a state of being non-self-conscious, as animals are, we
> > might be happier than we are now. Though maybe I am wrong.
> >
> > Maybe happiness is just _being_ happy?
> >
> > Kind regards,
> >
> > Annalisa
> >
>
>