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[Xmca-l] Re: L2



Martin

There are two responses to that.  The first is the unthinking access to
English in the American Melting Pot. Europeans happily sujectected
themselves to the task of learning American English (preferably with an
Irish accent :) ) It was a given. They had to learn to read and write in
English in order to get a job.  So they did. *What *they did seems to have
been obscure.  The people who did that up into the 1930s might well be dead
now, or limited in what they can remember.  I can remember my very
classrooms, the teachers, their names, specific episodes, incidents etc
etc.  Mo mother, born in 1920 could not even remember in which town she was
at school in, etc. and anyways she died seven years ago.

The other is where *refugees *who have no choice about losing their
language in the modern language melting pot - see one of the posts about
300+ languages in New York.  About that I think the episodes are so fast
moving to be ephemeral. And we don't have the luxury or having seen their
language in writing - there may be no writing system.

So - maybe ask the listserv.

Carol



On 3 November 2014 17:41, Martin John Packer <mpacker@uniandes.edu.co>
wrote:

> Yes, of course the children drown. What I'm wondering is how much it has
> been studied.
>
> When I search on Google Scholar for 'linguistic submersion' in the title,
> nothing appears:
>
> Your search - allintitle: "linguistic Submersion" - did not match any
> articles.
>
> Martin
>
> On Nov 3, 2014, at 10:31 AM, Carol Macdonald <carolmacdon@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Martin
> >
> > Thats the version called "Submersion". Children aptly drown.
> >
> > Carol
> >
> > On 3 November 2014 16:32, Martin John Packer <mpacker@uniandes.edu.co>
> > wrote:
> >
> >> Does the field of "bilingual education", then, include cases where the
> >> instruction is in only one language, one which the students did not
> grow up
> >> speaking? Or would that be called something else?
> >>
> >> Martin
> >>
> >> On Nov 3, 2014, at 7:29 AM, Peter Smagorinsky <smago@UGA.EDU> wrote:
> >>
> >>> 2. The whole field of bilingual education characterizes the areas in
> >> which you say there is nothing, at least in the US.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> > --
> > Carol A  Macdonald Ph D (Edin)
> > Developmental psycholinguist
> > Academic, Researcher,  and Editor
> > Honorary Research Fellow: Department of Linguistics, Unisa
>
>
>


-- 
Carol A  Macdonald Ph D (Edin)
Developmental psycholinguist
Academic, Researcher,  and Editor
Honorary Research Fellow: Department of Linguistics, Unisa