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[Xmca-l] Re: book of possible interest



Hi Francis,

Thanks for joining the conversation - I know how daunting it can be! I
think you are exactly right about the necessity of common ground, and that
is why I found working with the group of teachers after school so hard. I
initially did not know them or their practices so it was very difficult to
make connections, but after several sessions we at least had our own shared
experience within the group that we could draw upon. It was the analysis of
this problem that led to my use of Wolf-Michael Roth's approach to
co-teaching and co-generative dialogue in the second phase of my research.
The difference it made to be able to discuss the events my co-teacher and I
had shared in the classroom was HUGE.

I also agree that professional framing and identity are important aspects
which I don't think I fully explored in my PhD but am now starting to
explore further. I talked a lot about motives but I think it is also a lot
about helping teachers (re)build identities as agentic learners' and
professionals, rather than merely implementers of governmental directives.

Cheers,
Helen


Dr Helen Grimmett
Lecturer, Student Adviser,
Faculty of Education,
Room G64F, Building 902
Monash University, Berwick campus
Phone: 9904 7171

*New Book: *
The Practice of Teachers' Professional Development: A Cultural-Historical
Approach
<https://www.sensepublishers.com/catalogs/bookseries/professional-learning-1/the-practice-of-teachers-professional-development/>
Helen Grimmett (2014) Sense Publishers



<http://monash.edu.au/education/news/50-years/?utm_source=staff-email&utm_medium=email-signature&utm_campaign=50th>


On 16 July 2014 05:39, FRANCIS J. SULLIVAN <fsulliva@temple.edu> wrote:

> With great trepidation, I want to enter this conversation with my first
> post to the list (I have followed it for about a year now) because as both
> a researcher and teacher educator the issues raised are  major concerns of
> mine too. I find, I think it was David's point, the idea that we can think
> of the "connections" problem in two ways to be at the heart of the issue,
> at least for me. It is one thing to construct a connection that "adds to"
> the existing knowledge framework of others. But, it is a very different
> thing to sea5rch for a "connection" that requires others to qualitatively
> change, or even abandon, their existing framework. Helen seems to achieve
> such a connection with at least some of her teachers by helping them to
> re-cognize their own social identities so that the new knowledge and
> framework became less threatening and more inviting. She reconnected them
> with who they used to be and what they valued. So they did not see
> themselves as merely "ignorant" but more like retracing their steps.
> For me, at least, that's why the "deficit" models of teaching (or research)
> practices do not work. We--teachers and students--need to find a place from
> which we can begin this journey together, common ground so to speak. While
> a deaf person may not "know" English, I don't think that's the salient
> point. All of us don't know things. What seems to me salient in Helen's
> attempt to find connections, is that the very attempt challenged their
> current ways of framing their professional lives. What we might think of as
> "ignorance," those teachers thought of as "knowledge." And that "knowledge"
> was part and parcel of the ways they positioned themselves as teachers in
> relation to students.
>  I am tempted to put this into discourse analysis terms--I'm a
> semi-Hallidayan with a critical theory twist. But, I've said enough for a
> first post, I think. I hope it is useful.
>
> Francis J. Sullivan, Ph.D.
> Associate Professor
> Department of Teaching and Learning
> College of Education
> Temple University
> Philadelphia, PA 19122
>
>
> Find out what any people will quietly submit to and you have the exact
> measure of the injustice and wrong which will be imposed on them.
>
>  Frederick Douglass
>
>
> On Tue, Jul 15, 2014 at 2:10 AM, David Kellogg <dkellogg60@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Well, I do hope that Helen means that "for the moment", as I have learned
> > an awful lot from this book and even more from this discussion. You see,
> I
> > am trying to tease apart two very different processes that appear, on the
> > face of it, to be almost identical, but which also appear to have
> > diametrically opposite developmental effects.
> >
> > One process is the process of getting people to feel at ease,
> > confident, and happy that they understand what you are saying because it
> is
> > actually something that is identical or at least very similar to what
> they
> > already think. Another, almost identical, process is the process of
> > "establishing ties" between a new form of knowledge and an earlier one.
> > BOTH of these processes, it seems to me, occur throughout Helen's book,
> and
> > it is easy to mistake the one for the other. BOTH of these processes, to
> > use our earlier terminology, involve "establishing ties", but only one of
> > them also involves breaking away.
> >
> > For example, at one point in the book Helen, looking back over the
> Banksia
> > Bay PLZ data, rounds on herself for using a transparent piece of
> > scaffolding to elicit the word "communicate" from a group of teachers.
> What
> > bothers her is not that the answer itself is far too general to be of any
> > practical value to the teachers, but only that she had it very firmly in
> > mind, and kept badgering the teachers (as we all do, when we have a
> precise
> > answer in mind) until she got it. The alternative, she points out, would
> be
> > to take what she got and work with that.
> >
> > Yes indeed. But I think the main reason that would have been more
> > interesting is not that it would have resulted in fewer rejections of
> > teacher answers and made people more at ease, confdent, and happy that
> they
> > understood, but rather than it would have yielded something more like a
> > concrete but unconscious and not yet volitionally controlled example of
> > excellence from the teacher's own practice. I almost always find that the
> > actual answers I want--the "methods" I end up imparting to my own
> teachers,
> > are already present in the data they bring me (because we almost always
> > begin with actual transcripts of their lessons) but they are generally
> not
> > methods but only moments, and moments that go unnoticed and therefore
> > ungeneralized in the hurly burly of actual teaching.
> >
> > Last winter, Helen and I were at a conference in New Zealand where, among
> > other eventful episodes, Craig Brandist got up and gave a very precise
> list
> > of half a dozen different and utterly contradictory ways in which Bakhtin
> > uses the term "dialogue". Because the senses of "dialogue" are so many
> and
> > varied, people simply pick and choose, and they tend invariably to choose
> > the ones that are closest to the way they already think. It is as moments
> > like this that we need to remind ourselves that Bakhtin's "dialogue" does
> > not, for the most part, ever include children, or women; that he did not
> > "dialogue" with Volosinov or Medvedev when he allowed his acolytes
> > to plunder their corpses, and that his love of carnival and the public
> > marketplace does not extend to a belief in any form of political
> democracy.
> >
> > So I think we should start off with an understanding that what Vygotsky
> > says about defect is not the same was what we now believe. Vygotsky, for
> > example, believed that sign language was not true language, and that even
> > the congenitally deaf should be taught to lip read; this is simply
> > wrong. (On the other hand, what he says about spontaneously created sign
> > languages--that they are essentially elaborated systems of gesture and
> they
> > lack the signifying functions--fits exactly with Susan Goldin-Meadow's
> > observations in Chicago.)
> >
> > And one reason I think it is important to begin with this understanding
> is
> > this: sometimes--usually--LSV is right and we are wrong. In particular, I
> > think the "credit" view of defect, or, for that matter, ignorance of any
> > kind and not fully conscious teacher expertise risks becoming a liberal
> > platitude--the cup is always half full, so why not look on the bright
> side
> > of dearth? I certainly do not feel empowered by the fact that I know
> > English but I do not know ASL, and I rather doubt that deaf people feel
> > empowered by the opposite state of affairs. When I don't know something,
> I
> > do not see any bright side of not knowing it, for the very simple
> > reason that I can't see at all.
> >
> > Vygotsky was probably very influenced by "Iolanta", an opera that
> > Tchaikovsky wrote--he certainly seems to quote it extensively in the last
> > chapter of "Thinking and Speech". In "Iolanta", King Renee copes with the
> > blindness of his daughter by having her shut up in a garden and
> forbidding
> > all his subjects from discussing light, sight, color or anything visible
> in
> > any way. Vaudemont, a knight of Burgundy, blunders into the garden,
> > discovers Iolanta's secret. Iolanta convinces him that sight is
> > unnecessary, but in the course of doing so, she develops the desire to
> see
> > and choose for herself.
> >
> > David Kelogg
> > Hankuk University of Foreign Studies
> >
> >
> >
> > On 15 July 2014 11:12, Andy Blunden <ablunden@mira.net> wrote:
> >
> > > My reading of Vygotsky on 'defectology' was that the 'defect' was the
> > > problem in social relations, that is, the person who is different in
> some
> > > way suffers because of the way that difference is treated or not
> treated
> > by
> > > others, not for anything in itself. One and the same feature could be a
> > > great benefit or a fatal flaw, depending on how others react to it.
> > > Except insofar as introducing the idea of a "credit view" is a move
> aimed
> > > at changing the perceptions and behaviours of others in relation to the
> > > subject, I don't think Vygotsky is an advocate of the mirror image of a
> > > deficit view. As I see it, he analyses the problem of the person being
> > > treated as deficient by means of the unit of *defect-compensation*. The
> > > defect (a problem arising in social interaction, with others) generates
> > > certain challenges which are overcome, generally also in interaction
> with
> > > others. This "compensation" leads to what Helen could call a "credit"
> and
> > > it is the dynamic set up between the social defect and social
> > compensation
> > > which shapes the subject's psychology and their relation to others.
> > > Andy
> > >
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > > *Andy Blunden*
> > > http://home.pacific.net.au/~andy/
> > >
> > >
> > > Helen Grimmett wrote:
> > >
> > >> I think what is unique about Vygotsky's work in defectology is that,
> > >> despite the name, it is not a deficit view (in the way that I
> understand
> > >> the term) at all.
> > >>
> > >> I understand the commonly used term 'deficit view' as a focus on what
> > >> children are 'missing' that needs to be provided to them by teachers
> to
> > >> bring them up to a pre-conceived idea of 'normal' for their age/grade
> > >> level
> > >> etc. Whereas, a 'credit view' focuses on what children are able to do
> > and
> > >> bring to a learning situation, in which, in the interaction with
> others,
> > >> they will be able to become more able to do and 'be' more than they
> were
> > >> before (i.e. to develop), whether this be in the 'expected' ways to
> the
> > >> 'expected' level or in completely different ways to a variety of
> > different
> > >> levels beyond or outside 'standard' expectations. From the little I
> have
> > >> read on defectology I think this is what Vygotsky was advocating -
> that
> > >> despite a child's blindness or deafness etc, development was still
> > >> possible
> > >> if mediational means were found that made use of the child's credits
> > (i.e.
> > >> using sign language or braille so that children still had access to
> the
> > >> developmental opportunities provided by language). So I think your
> term
> > >> pre-abled is in fact a credit view rather than a deficit view.
> > >>
> > >> I was attempting to also use a credit view in my work with the
> > teachers. I
> > >> saw them as being experienced practitioners who had lots to bring to
> our
> > >> discussions of teaching and learning, in which together we could see
> > what
> > >> could be developed (new practices, new understandings). Once Kay and
> > Mike
> > >> realised this they got on board and engaged in the process and
> (possibly
> > >> for the first time in a long while as they both saw themselves [and in
> > >> fact
> > >> are officially designated as] 'expert teachers') really reawakened the
> > >> process of developing as professionals. They blew off most of the
> > content
> > >> I
> > >> was contributing, but they realised the process was actually about
> > >> 'unsticking' their own development and working out new and personally
> > >> interesting and meaningful ways of 'becoming' more as teachers,
> instead
> > of
> > >> being stuck 'being' the teacher they had turned into over the years.
> Not
> > >> all of the teachers made this leap in the time I worked with them
> > though.
> > >> Others were either quite disgruntled that I wouldn't provide them with
> > >> answers to 'fix' their own perceived deficits or patiently waited for
> me
> > >> to
> > >> go away and stop rocking the boat. From what I can gather though, Ann
> > (the
> > >> principal) kept the boat rocking and managed over time to get more
> > >> teachers
> > >> to buy into the process of learning from each other and
> collaboratively
> > >> creating new practices. As we said earlier, development takes time as
> > well
> > >> as effort.
> > >>
> > >> All I've got time for at the moment!
> > >>
> > >> Helen
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> Dr Helen Grimmett
> > >> Lecturer, Student Adviser,
> > >> Faculty of Education,
> > >> Room G64F, Building 902
> > >> Monash University, Berwick campus
> > >> Phone: 9904 7171
> > >>
> > >> *New Book: *
> > >> The Practice of Teachers' Professional Development: A
> > Cultural-Historical
> > >> Approach
> > >> <https://www.sensepublishers.com/catalogs/bookseries/
> > >> professional-learning-1/the-practice-of-teachers-
> > >> professional-development/>
> > >> Helen Grimmett (2014) Sense Publishers
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> <http://monash.edu.au/education/news/50-years/?utm_
> > >> source=staff-email&utm_medium=email-signature&utm_campaign=50th>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> On 14 July 2014 14:43, David Kellogg <dkellogg60@gmail.com> wrote:
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>> Near the end of Chapter Three (p. 81), Helen is summing up her
> > experience
> > >>> with the Banksia Bay PLZ and she notes with some dismay that her
> PDers
> > >>> have
> > >>> "a deficit view" of their children and tend towards "container
> models"
> > of
> > >>> the mind ("empty vessel, sponge, blank canvas"). Only one teacher,
> Ann
> > >>> sees
> > >>> anything wrong with this, and Helen says "they don't necessarily
> value
> > >>> her
> > >>> opinion".
> > >>>
> > >>>  Helen finds herself rather conflicted: One the one hand, she says
> "If
> > >>> their representations of children really do represent their beliefs,
> > then
> > >>> they are probably right to insist there is no need to change." And on
> > the
> > >>> other, she says "My intention was never to say that their present
> > >>> practice
> > >>> was wrong, but to help them see alternative ways of thinking about
> > >>> children, learning, and teaching."
> > >>>
> > >>> Of course, if there is no need to change, then it follows that there
> is
> > >>> no
> > >>> reason to look for alternative ways of thinking about children,
> > learning
> > >>> and teaching. The only reason for spending scarce cognitive resources
> > on
> > >>> seeing different ways of looking at children is if you do, in fact,
> > take
> > >>> a
> > >>> deficit view of the teachers. Ann, and the Regional Consultants,
> > >>> apparently
> > >>> do, but Helen realizes that there isn't much basis for this: not only
> > do
> > >>> we
> > >>> have no actual data of lessons to look at, we know that one of the
> > >>> teachers, Kay, has been in the classroom for three decades (during
> > which
> > >>> time Helen has spent at least one decade OUT of the classroom).
> > >>>
> > >>> While we were translating Vygotsky's "History of the Development of
> the
> > >>> Higher Psychological Functions" last year, some of my colleagues were
> > >>> taken
> > >>> aback by Vygotsky's use of terms like "moron", "imbecile", "idiot",
> and
> > >>> "cretin". Of course, Vygotsky is writing long before the "euphemisim
> > >>> treadmill" turned these into playground insults; for Vygotsky they
> are
> > >>> quite precise descriptors--not of cognitive ability but actually of
> > >>> LANGUAGE ability. But because our readership are progressive Korean
> > >>> teachers with strong views about these questions, we found that we
> > >>> couldn't
> > >>> even use the term "mentally retarded" without a strongly worded
> > footnote
> > >>> disavowing the "deficit" thinking behind the term.
> > >>>
> > >>> I think that Vygotsky would have been surprised by this. I think he
> > took
> > >>> it
> > >>> for granted that a defect was a deficit: being blind means a deficit
> in
> > >>> vision, and being deaf means a deficit in hearing. In the same way, a
> > >>> brain
> > >>> defect is not an asset. On the other hand, I think Vygotsky would
> find
> > >>> our
> > >>> own term "disabled" quite inaccurate: since all forms of development
> > are
> > >>> compensatory and involve "circuitous routes" of one kind or another,
> > and
> > >>> all developed children, even, and even especially, gifted children,
> > >>> contain
> > >>> islands of underdevelopment, the correct term for deficits of all
> kinds
> > >>> is
> > >>> not "disabled" but "pre-abled".
> > >>>
> > >>> Personally, I see nothing wrong with a deficit view of children that
> > sees
> > >>> them as pre-abled (or, as Vygotsky liked to say, 'primitivist"; that
> > is,
> > >>> they are waiting for the mediational means that we have foolishly
> > >>> developed
> > >>> only for the psychophysiologically most common types to catch up with
> > the
> > >>> actual variation in real children. I suspect this view is actually
> > quite
> > >>> a
> > >>> bit closer to what Kay thinks than to what Helen thinks.
> > >>>
> > >>> David Kellogg
> > >>> Hankuk University of Foreign Studies
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> On 13 July 2014 10:59, Helen Grimmett <helen.grimmett@monash.edu>
> > wrote:
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> Hi David,
> > >>>>
> > >>>> Interesting question. I absolutely think that development AS a
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> professional
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> is necessary, just as development as a human is necessary, so if
> > >>>> professional development is seen as the practice in which this
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> development
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> is produced then absolutely I do think it is necessary. The form
> that
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> this
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> practice takes though, and indeed the form of the development that
> is
> > >>>> produced within this practice, are the things open to question
> > however.
> > >>>>
> > >>>> I definitely think that a teacher's development as a professional
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> includes
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> the need to understand their practice better rather than just change
> > it,
> > >>>> but I think that understanding often develops best in/alongside/with
> > the
> > >>>> process of changing (and vice versa) rather than separately from it,
> > >>>> and,
> > >>>> as you point out above, in establishing ties *between* people and
> then
> > >>>> within them. So a practice of professional development that creates
> > >>>> conditions which support this type of development will (I believe)
> be
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> much
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> more effective than traditional forms of PD that either attempt to
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> lecture
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> about theoretical principles but do not support teachers to transfer
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> these
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> into practical changes, OR provide teachers with practical programs
> > and
> > >>>> expect them to implement them without any understanding of what and
> > why
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> the
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> changes matter. I think the term "Professional Development" is an
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> absolute
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> misnomer for either of those typical approaches.
> > >>>>
> > >>>> So again, I have a problem with names! I'm talking about
> Professional
> > >>>> Development with a completely different meaning than what most of
> the
> > >>>> education community believe it to mean when they talk about
> attending
> > PD
> > >>>> seminars or workshops. I toyed with trying to find a different name
> > for
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> the
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> particular meaning I'm talking about, but when you are talking about
> > >>>> development from a cultural-historical theoretical perspective then
> > >>>> there
> > >>>> really is no other word to use! That's why I stuck to using
> > >>>> 'professional
> > >>>> development' (in full) when I meant my meaning, and PD (which is
> what
> > >>>> teachers in Australia commonly refer to seminars and workshops as)
> > when
> > >>>> I
> > >>>> refer to the typical (and in my view, usually non-developmental)
> forms
> > >>>> of
> > >>>> activities that teachers are subjected to each year.
> > >>>>
> > >>>> So, I agree that the need for PD is questionable, but the need for
> > >>>> practices of professional development that help teachers to develop
> as
> > >>>> professionals (that is, to develop a unified understanding of both
> the
> > >>>> theoretical and practical aspects of their work, which is itself
> > >>>> continually developing in order to meet the changing needs of their
> > >>>> students, schools and society) is essential. While I think
> co-teaching
> > >>>> is
> > >>>> one practical small-scale solution, working out viable, economical,
> > and
> > >>>> manageable ways to create these practices on a large-scale is a very
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> large
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> problem.
> > >>>>
> > >>>> Cheers,
> > >>>> Helen
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>> Dr Helen Grimmett
> > >>>> Lecturer, Student Adviser,
> > >>>> Faculty of Education,
> > >>>> Room G64F, Building 902
> > >>>> Monash University, Berwick campus
> > >>>> Phone: 9904 7171
> > >>>>
> > >>>> *New Book: *
> > >>>> The Practice of Teachers' Professional Development: A
> > >>>> Cultural-Historical
> > >>>> Approach
> > >>>> <
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> https://www.sensepublishers.com/catalogs/bookseries/
> > >>> professional-learning-1/the-practice-of-teachers-
> > >>> professional-development/
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> Helen Grimmett (2014) Sense Publishers
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>> <
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>> http://monash.edu.au/education/news/50-years/?utm_
> > >>> source=staff-email&utm_medium=email-signature&utm_campaign=50th
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> On 13 July 2014 08:57, David Kellogg <dkellogg60@gmail.com> wrote:
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> Helen:
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>> Good to hear from you at long last--I knew you were lurking out
> there
> > >>>>> somewhere!
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>> I didn't actually write the line about "establishing ties"--it's
> from
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> "The
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> Little Prince". The prince asks what "tame" means, and the fox
> > replies
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> that
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> it means "to establish ties". But of course what I meant was that
> > ties
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> are
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> established first between people and then within them; the ties of
> > >>>>> development are interfunctional ties that make up a new
> psychological
> > >>>>> system. (Or, for Halliday, they are the inter-systemic ties that
> make
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> up
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> new metafunctions.)
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>> As you say, Yrjo Engestrom chooses to emphasize another aspect of
> > >>>>> development with "breaking away"--he wants to stress its
> > crisis-ridden
> > >>>>> nature. I agree with this, actually, but mostly I agree with you,
> > that
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> we
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> are talking about two moments of the same process. To me, breaking
> > away
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> is
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> really a precondition of the real business of establishing ties.
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>> Thomas Piketty makes a similar point in his book "Capital in the
> > >>>>> Twenty-first Century". He admits that war and revolution is the
> only
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> thing
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> that EVER counteracts the tendency of returns from capital to
> > outstrip
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> the
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> growth in income, and that the 20th Century was an outlier in this
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> respect,
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> and the Russian revolution an extreme outlier within that outlier.
> > But
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> he
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> also says that in the long run the one thing that makes UPWARD
> > mobility
> > >>>>> possible is education. Despite everything, because of everything.
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>> I finished the book a few days ago. I guess the thing I most want
> to
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> ask
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> about is the assumption that professional development is necessary
> at
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> all.
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> Doesn't it make more sense to say that before we change what we are
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> doing,
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> we should understand it better?
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>> David Kellogg
> > >>>>> Hankuk University of Foreign Studies
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>> On 12 July 2014 13:20, Helen Grimmett <helen.grimmett@monash.edu>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>> wrote:
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> Ah, I think you have hit the nail on the head David. It is indeed
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> TIME
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> that
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> is so crucial - not only duration of time, but also location of
> time
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> (which
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> I suppose is really context).
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>> The problems I had with Mike and his colleagues about the
> > terminology
> > >>>>>> stemmed partly from the typical Aussie disdain for using words
> that
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> might
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> make your mates think you are trying to appear 'better' than them,
> so
> > >>>>>> therefore you mock anything that sounds too serious or
> intellectual.
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> But
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> beyond this surface level of complaining the problems Huw and you
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> have
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> been
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> discussing boil down to problems with time.
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>> Huw's complaint about my use of the heading "Features of
> > >>>>>> Cultural-Historical Learning Activities" is well justified - but
> it
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> was
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> really just a shorthand written version of what I was verbally
> asking
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> for
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> as "What might be some particular features of learning activities
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> that
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> would align with principles of Cultural-Historical Theory?" That
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> would
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> have
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> taken too long to write on the top of the piece of paper - and of
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> course
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> time is always too short in any after-school PD so shortcuts are
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> inevitably
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> taken. (Time problem #1)
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>> Time problem #2, which your discussion has highlighted for me, is
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> that
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> of
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> course my question was really "What might be some particular
> features
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> of
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> learning activities that would align with THE LIMITED NUMBER OF
> (AND
> > >>>>>> LIMITED UNDERSTANDING OF) principles of Cultural-Historical Theory
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> THAT
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> YOU
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> HAVE BEEN INTRODUCED TO SO FAR?" so I really should have not been
> so
> > >>>>>> surprised that they would find the brainstorming activity
> difficult
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> and
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> resort to diversionary tactics! (Mike's outburst posted here by
> David
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> was
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> not the only eventful moment I write about from this one activity.
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> But
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> these apparent failures actually provided much more interesting data
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> for
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> me
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> and eventually lead me to several key findings in my thesis). I
> had
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> spent
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> several years by this stage reading and discussing Vygotsky and
> yet I
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> had
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> assumed/hoped the teachers would have enough understanding from my
> > >>>>>> (probably not very good) explanations ABOUT theory over the
> previous
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> 3
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> short sessions I had had with them to be able to contribute answers
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> to
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> my
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> brainstorm question. They had not had enough TIME to become
> familiar
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> with
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> enough of the theory to make much sense of it yet - but still, we
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> have
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> to
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> start somewhere and this was still early days.
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>> Time problem #3 brings in what I called above the location of
> time.
> > I
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> had
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> never intended for the sessions to be me giving after-school
> lectures
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> about
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> either theory or practice, yet this is what the teachers seemed to
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> expect
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> from me (and even demand from me) and were pretty disgruntled when
> I
> > >>>>>> wouldn't/couldn't deliver. My intention was always to get them to
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> engage
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> with the relationship between THEORY and PRACTICE, just as David's
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> comic
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> book discusses the relationship between THINKING and SPEECH or
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> EMOTION
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> and
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> COGNITION. My problem of course was that once we were in an
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> after-school
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> meeting we were removed in both time and space from where theory
> and
> > >>>>>> practice of teaching/learning operate as a relation (i.e. the
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> classroom
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> activity). I was actually trying to create/use our own PLZ
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> (Professional
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> Learning ZPD) as the activity in which to develop and understand
> this
> > >>>>>> relationship but it was initially very hard to get the teachers to
> > >>>>>> understand this (at least until we had enough of David's Fox's
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> socially
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> shared experiences for the meanings to become communicable) and then
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> even
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> more difficult to get them to transfer this back to developing
> their
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> own
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> classroom teaching. Ironically, despite being the loudest
> complainers
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> and
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> disparagers, it was Mike and Kay (the protagonist of my other
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> eventful
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> moment in the brainstorming session) who actually ended up making
> the
> > >>>>>> biggest changes in their classroom practice. Perhaps this is not
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> really
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> surprising at all - they were the ones who obviously engaged and
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> argued
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> with the ideas and activities rather than simply endured them!
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>> My eventual answer to the problems encountered in my work with the
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> group
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> of
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> teachers was to work WITH a teacher IN her own classroom so that
> we
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> had
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> shared experiences of the relationship between theory and practice
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> which
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> could not only be discussed after the events, but also actually
> acted
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> upon
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> there and then IN the event - creating what I called "Situated
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> Conscious
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> Awareness" of both the theoretical and practical aspects of the
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> concepts
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> of
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> teaching/learning and development we were developing understanding
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> and
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> practice of together. But perhaps I should wait until David gets up
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> to
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> this
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> part of the book before I say more!
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>> Finally, one other point that really caught my attention in your
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> comic
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> book
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> David is that your prince calls development "to establish ties"
> > which
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> is
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> an
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> interesting difference to Engestrom's definition as "breaking
> away".
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> But
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> perhaps, as always in CH theory, it is not a matter of either/or
> but
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> in
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> fact both/and ideas that are necessary. From what I learned in my
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> study,
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> teachers' development as professionals is definitely BOTH about
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> breaking
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> away from old, routinised understandings and practices AND
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> establishing
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> new
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> connections between and amongst theoretical concepts and
> practices,
> > >>>>>> enabling them to continually develop new competences and motives
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> across
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> all
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> of their professional duties.
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>> Thanks for your interest in my book David. The discussion it has
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> sparked
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> has helped me revisit ideas from new perspectives.
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>> Cheers,
> > >>>>>> Helen
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>> Dr Helen Grimmett
> > >>>>>> Lecturer, Student Adviser,
> > >>>>>> Faculty of Education,
> > >>>>>> Room G64F, Building 902
> > >>>>>> Monash University, Berwick campus
> > >>>>>> Phone: 9904 7171
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>> *New Book: *
> > >>>>>> The Practice of Teachers' Professional Development: A
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> Cultural-Historical
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> Approach
> > >>>>>> <
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> https://www.sensepublishers.com/catalogs/bookseries/
> > >>> professional-learning-1/the-practice-of-teachers-
> > >>> professional-development/
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> Helen Grimmett (2014) Sense Publishers
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>> <
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>> http://monash.edu.au/education/news/50-years/?utm_
> > >>> source=staff-email&utm_medium=email-signature&utm_campaign=50th
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> On 12 July 2014 07:29, David Kellogg <dkellogg60@gmail.com> wrote:
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> Plekhanov distinguishes between "agitators" and "propagandists".
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> Agitators
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> are essentially popularizers; they have the job of ripping away a
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> subset
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> of
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> smaller and simpler ideas from a fabric of much larger and more
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> complex
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> theory and then disseminating them amongst the largest possible
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> number
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> of
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> people. In other words, their focus is exoteric. Propagandists are
> > >>>>>>> essentially conspiratorial: they have the job of initiating a
> small
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> number
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> of the elect and educating them in the whole theoretical
> system--as
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> Larry
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> would say, the full Bildung. In other words, their focus is
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> esoteric.
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> As
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> you can see, Plekhanov was good at making distinctions, and not so
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> good
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> at
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> showing how things are linked. For Helena, who is a  labor
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> educator,
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> you
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> can't really be an effective agitator unless you are also a
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> propagandist.
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> You need to present your exoteric extracts in such a way that they
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> are,
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> to
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> borrow Larry's phrase, both necessary and sufficient to lead
> people
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> on
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> to
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> the esoterica. I'm with Helena--and with Bruner--with children
> it's
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> always
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> possible to tell the truth, part of the truth, but nothing but
> the
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> truth,
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> and if we can do it with kids, why not do it with adults?
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> (I am less sure about what it means to say that the objectively
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> human
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> is
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> the "subjectively historical"--it sounds like history is being
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> reified
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> as a
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> subject, that is, as a living, breathing, acting "World Spirit"
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> that
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> can
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> have a mind and reflect upon itself. My understanding of history
> is
> > >>>>>>> that just as we cannot have the advanced form of historical
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> consciousness
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> in dialogue with the more primitive forms, the opportunity to
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> reflect
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> upon
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> the whole process when it is all over is simply never going to be
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> available
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> to anyone. The Merleau-Ponty quotation is beautiful and intensely
> > >>>>>>> poetic, Larry--but when I look at a bubble or a wave, I do not
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> simply
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> see
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> chaos; I see past bubbles and past waves, and potential bubbles
> and
> > >>>>>>> potential waves. Isn't that a part of the experience of "loving
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> history"
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> as
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> well?)
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> My wife wrote a wonderful Ph.D. thesis about how any work of
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> literature
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> can
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> be looked at on four time frames: phylogenetic (the history of a
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> genre),
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> ontogenetic (the biography of a career), logogenetic (the
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> development
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> of
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> a
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> plot or a character), and microgenetic (the unfolding of a
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> dialogue,
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> or a
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> paragraph). Her supervisor complained about the terminology in
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> somewhat
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> more elegant terms than Mike does in Helen's data:and suggested
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> that
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> she
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> should replace the terms with "history", "biography",
> "development"
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> and
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> "unfolding", to make it more exoteric.
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> I think that if she had done that, it would have made the thesis
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> into
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> agitation rather than education. Yes, the terms would have been
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> more
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> familiar, and they might even, given other context, be taken to
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> mean
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> the
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> same thing. But what we would have gotten is good, clear
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> distinctions
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> ("history" on the one hand and "biography" on the other) and what
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> we
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> would
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> have lost is the linkedness of one time frame to another--the way
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> in
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> which
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> the phylogenesis of genre produces the mature genre which is used
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> in
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> an
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> author's ontegenesis, and the way in which the author's ontogenesis
> > >>>>>>> produces the starting point and the raw materials for the
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> logogenetic
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> development of a work, not to mention the way in which logogenesis
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> is
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> reflected in the microgenetic unfolding of dialogue.
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> So I think that when Helena writes that anything can be explained
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> to
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> anyone
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> in language that is everyday and simple and in a way that is
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> understandable
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> and at least part of the whole truth, I agree somewhat enviously
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> (you
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> see,
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> Helena is a labor educator, but I teach TESOL, which is really
> the
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> process
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> of taking a few very simple and exoteric ideas that good teachers
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> already
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> have and disseminating the select to the elect for vast sums of
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> money).
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> But
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> I have to add a rider--when we popularize richly woven fabrics of
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> ideas
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> like cultural historical theory we are not simply juggling
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> vocabulary.
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> I
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> think that Helena recognizes this perfectly when she says that it
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> takes
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> TIME to be simple and clear. If it were simply a matter of
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> replacing
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> "cultural historical" with "community of learners" it would
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> actually
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> take
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> less time, but it isn't and it doesn't.
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> It is very hot in Seoul today, and somewhere out there a toddler
> is
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> arguing
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> with a parent because he wants watermelon with breakfast. The
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> parent
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> resists, because if you eat cold watermelon on an empty stomach you
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> get a
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> tummy-ache. The argument grows heated and long--and complex, but
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> the
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> complexity is of a particular kind, with very short, repeated,
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> insistancies
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> from the child and somewhat longer more complex remonstrations
> from
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> the
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> parent. We can call this complex discourse but simple grammar. A
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> few
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> years
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> will go by and we will find that the school child has mastered
> the
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> trick
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> of
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> long and complex remonstrations and can use them pre-emptively to
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> win
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> arguments. We can call this complex grammar, but simple vocabulary.
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> Only
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> when a decade or two has elapsed will we find that child, now
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> adult,
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> can
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> use the language of science, which is for the most part
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> grammatically
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> simple (at least compared to the pre-emptive remonstrations of the
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> school
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> child), but full of very complex vocabulary (e.g. "phylogeny
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> anticipates
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> ontogeny", or "cultural-historical activity theory enables
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> communities
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> of
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> learners").
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> It's Saturday today, and in a few minutes I have to leave for the
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> weekly
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> meeting of our translation group, which produces mighty tomes
> which
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> we
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> produce to popularize the works of Vygotsky amongst militant
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> teachers
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> here
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> in Korea (our version of "Thinking and Speech" is seven hundred
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> pages
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> long
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> because of all the explanatory notes and boxes with helpful
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> pictures).
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> On
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> the other hand, there is the attached comic book version of the
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> first
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> chapter of "Thinking and Speech" which I wrote a couple of years
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> ago
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> for
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> some graduate students who were having trouble talking about the
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> real
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> "Thinking and Speech" in class.
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> I think you can see that Huw's complaint is justified--the comic
> > >>>>>>> book dialogue is "about" Thinking and Speech, but it is not
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> "Thinking
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> and
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> Speech" at all, in the same way that "community of learners" or
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> "biography"
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> is ABOUT cultural historical theory or ontogenesis. And I think
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> that
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> part
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> of the problem (but only part of it) is that the comic book is
> just
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> too
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> short.
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> David Kellogg
> > >>>>>>> Hankuk University of Foreign Studies
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> 2014-07-11 17:09 GMT+09:00 Leif Strandberg <
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>> leifstrandberg.ab@telia.com
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> :
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> 11 jul 2014 kl. 06:41 skrev Larry Purss <lpscholar2@gmail.com>:
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>> David,
> > >>>>>>>>> I have been following your reflections through this thread.
> > >>>>>>>>> You commented:
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>> So it's almost always more useful for me to
> > >>>>>>>>> think of learning phenomena as NOT reducible to the physical,
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> at
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> least
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> not
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>> in their unit of analysis
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>> I have been reflecting on the notion of *bildung* as learning.
> > >>>>>>>>> The notion of *cultivation* and *disposition* and *comportment*
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> as
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> the
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> potential of learning.
> > >>>>>>>>> I came across this quote from Gramsci who was questioning the
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> notion
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> of
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> *laws* as the basis for making social predictions. Such *laws*
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> excluded
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> the
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>> subjective factor from history.
> > >>>>>>>>> Gramsci wrote on social process: "Objective always means
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> 'humanly
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> objective' which can be held to correspond exactly to
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> 'historically
> > >>>>
> > >>>>
> > >>>>> subjective' "
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>> Merleau-Ponty also explored what I refer to as *disposition*
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> with
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> this
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> quote on the reality of history:
> > >>>>>>>>> History "awakens us to the importance of daily events and
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> action.
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> For
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> it
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> is
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>> a philosophy [of history -LP] which arouses in us a love for
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> our
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> times
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>
> > >>>>>>> which are not the simple repetition of human eternity nor
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> merely
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> the
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> conclusion of premises already postulated. It is a view that
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> like
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> the
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> most
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>> fragile object of perception - a soap bubble, or a wave - or
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> like
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>> the
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>
> > >>>>>> most
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>> simple dialogue, embraces indivisibly all the order and all the
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> disorder
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>> of
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>> the world."
> > >>>>>>>>
> > >>>>>>>>
> >
>