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[Xmca-l] Re: Playing with/at TED



Thanks, Larry...to be pondered!!
Lois

Lois Holzman
Director, East Side Institute for Group & Short Term Psychotherapy
104-106 South Oxford Street
Brooklyn, New York 11217
Chair, Global Outreach, All Stars Project, UX
Tel. +1.212.941.8906 x324
Fax +1.718.797.3966
lholzman@eastsideinstitute.org 
Social Media
Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter
Blogs
Psychology Today| Psychology of Becoming | ESI Community News
Websites
Lois Holzman | East Side Institute | Performing the World
All Stars Project

 

On Jul 6, 2014, at 4:12 PM, Larry Purss <lpscholar2@gmail.com> wrote:

> Lois, Greg
> 
> This theme of *radical* play [going to the root of play] and Greg's playing
> with the term *otherwise* than the real/actual I hope can be played with a
> little further.
> 
> I *read* this theme of emerging lived experience / live experiencing [from
> D Kellogg in the other post] as pointing to *human nature* as playing
> between the literal and metaphorical
> 
> Merleau-Ponty suggests that subjects and objects SIMULTANEOUSLY emerge
> within  / clearings  /  fields  / dimensions /
> and the difficulty arises when we expand an *object* to become perceived AS
> THE  /field/clearing/dimension.
> We loose sight of the *object* as an *aspect* of the clearing [where
> becoming/not becoming are being *played out* within the simultaneous
> emergence of subjectivity and objectivity] and we become lost in the object
> AS IF it was the dimension of experience.
> 
> Mike, this playful theme I *read* also as an example of the metaphor of the
> *developmental spiral* moving between *individuation* [subjectivity] AND
> *integration* [self's return to original source at a *higher* level of
> *development*
> As I listened to Anna Stetsenko's contrasting Dewey's *transactional* model
> with her *transformational* model I also *read* another version of this
> *spiral* metaphor of subject and object playfully emerging within lived
> experience / live experienced backward and forward play
> 
> This theme also ties in with the question of *humanism* within the notion
> of *human nature* Is the character [quality] of *play* a transhistorical
> phenomena?? Joel Kovel defines *transhistorical* as a phenomena that is a
> property of *human nature* that needs to be manifest in all historical
> situations, whwerever humans have made there world. Transhistorical
> phenomena cannot be confined to particular historical locations. On the
> other hand the transhistorical is not natural either [in the informal
> sense] since the transhistorical ONLY manifests historically and so is
> shaped decisively by particular historical conditions.
> Transhistorical phenomena do confer a degree of universality and
> *essentiality* to the notion of human nature.
> Is it possible that *radical* play [could be otherwise] is a
> transhistorical aspect mediating BETWEEN *human* AND *nature*??
> 
> Joel Kovel suggests there is an ensemble of five qualities/ideas of
> *nature* which are variations on the THEME of *otherness* A sense that our
> *human being* reflects a sense that our being is a part and yet distinct
> from nature. A sense of our human incompleteness and mortality. Therefore
> the metaphor of the *developmental spiral* playing out through the
> Christian fall of the soul away from God, through neo-platonists through
> Romantic return to nature and moving to current models of psychology and
> even *critical hermeneutics* [see Joel Kovel]
> 
> AN ASIDE: Joel identifies nature's five qualities as *essence* *vital
> force* *real material world*  *past* and *archetypal primal mother*  He
> suggests all five qualities are variations on the theme of *otherness* [and
> I would add *desire for return to integration]
> 
> I *read* radical play as possibly participating in this spiral metaphor AS
> a *root* metaphor [radical AS root]
> 
> Larry
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Sat, Jul 5, 2014 at 8:41 PM, Lois Holzman <lholzman@eastsideinstitute.org
>> wrote:
> 
>> Apologies, Greg, for the delay in responding to this very meaty message! I
>> appreciate that it led you in many directions and you took the time to
>> share them with me and xmca. I read it quickly and then overlooked it all
>> this time.
>> 
>> I think you've understood much of what I try to say about play but not
>> all. I'm relieved you read me as unorthodox!!
>> Let me try to "yes, and" you and myself.
>> What's key to me is not restraint or not, but the reshaping ("playing
>> with") the dialectic who we are/not who we are of, being/becoming. This is
>> both a point of departure from Vygotsky and at the same time it comes from
>> him. I do think that his description of early childhood
>> learning-and-development, and of the importance of imitation, and doing
>> what you don't know how to do — these are instances of being/becoming and
>> very much—in their social activity-ness—like the way he describes early
>> childhood play as "a head taller." He, as we know, makes a distinction
>> between play being the leading activity of young children and learning of
>> school age children—I think he didn't see the similarity in both "Play and
>> Non-play" for young children—at least not the similarity that I see. In
>> both, the child is engaging in a kind of being/becoming play/performance.
>> So for me it is the simultaneity of being who we are and who we are not
>> (other) that is what's the exciting and life span activity of playing,
>> performing. (You can download my chapter, without Creating ZPDs There is No
>> Creativity, in Vygotsky and Creativity at
>> http://loisholzman.org/media/chapters/).
>> So games, winners, losers, etc. are features of some play but not of all
>> play. And I like what Vygotsky has to say about this and rules and
>> imagination.
>> 
>> I also understand play (in my sense of it) as how we human beings create
>> culture...we don't just appropriate it.
>> 
>> Again, thank you,
>> Lois
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Lois Holzman
>> Director, East Side Institute for Group & Short Term Psychotherapy
>> 104-106 South Oxford Street
>> Brooklyn, New York 11217
>> Chair, Global Outreach, All Stars Project, UX
>> Tel. +1.212.941.8906 x324
>> Fax +1.718.797.3966
>> lholzman@eastsideinstitute.org
>> Social Media
>> Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter
>> Blogs
>> Psychology Today| Psychology of Becoming | ESI Community News
>> Websites
>> Lois Holzman | East Side Institute | Performing the World
>> All Stars Project
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Jun 25, 2014, at 2:09 PM, Greg Thompson <greg.a.thompson@gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>> 
>>> Lois,
>>> I wonder if the following captures your meaning/sense of the word "play":
>>> 
>>> Play is an engagement with "the otherwise".
>>> In a sense, play involves bringing irrealis into reality.
>>> 
>>> I really like this way of thinking about play (and I may be reading too
>>> much into your understanding of play so please correct me if I've
>>> misunderstood you). For me, this idea of play is much more applicable to
>>> the lives of adults and it opens up lots of encounters to a play
>> analysis.
>>> I assume that this is what you mean when you say that the kids talking
>> with
>>> police are "playing"; they are engaged in a type of relationship and
>>> interaction that is "otherwise" - it isn't part of the normal types of
>>> conversation that one expects to happen.
>>> 
>>> This points up the fact that there are structured, expected relations
>> that
>>> we engage in as we go about our everyday lives. Lois, what you seem to me
>>> to be pointing to is that play involves the transformation of these
>>> expected relations, i.e. when "the otherwise" is realized in a moment of
>>> interaction.
>>> 
>>> It seems that this is a rather unorthodox sense of play. I wonder if it
>>> comes out of the fact that you work primarily with adolescents and
>> adults,
>>> "grown-ups" as we emically refer to them. It seems likely to me that play
>>> is something very fundamentally different for grown-ups than it is for
>>> children. Most Vygotsky inspired play researchers are looking at play in
>>> toddlers and early childhood. So I am very excited by your work that
>> brings
>>> play into adulthood (and as Artin notes, there are others who do this
>> but I
>>> don't know how many theorize adult "play" as explicitly or as well as you
>>> do).
>>> 
>>> It seems to me that somewhere in here is where David's problem lies (and
>>> yours, to the extent that you are willing to share this burden with him).
>>> He is pointing to the fact that "play" may be conceived in China as "lack
>>> of restraint", and that is why Chinese say that they haven't played since
>>> they were 2 year olds - they have primarily experienced restraint ever
>>> since then (regardles of how they might be engaging "the otherwise" in
>>> their everyday lives - even "teasing" could be a kind of engagement with
>>> "the otherwise"). And David interestingly points to the fact that play
>> has
>>> a class dimension - it is what the poor kids do in the streets. That
>> seems
>>> like a notion of play that needs to be played with. And it seems to me
>> that
>>> this is precisely what you are interested in doing even as you accept
>> their
>>> definition of play for the sake of making your argument in the first
>> place.
>>> 
>>> I think we could push even further still and point out that life is play
>> in
>>> a very real(!) sense. The taken for granted social worlds that we inhabit
>>> and that we are trying to play with are, in the first place, play. And
>>> yet, we often don't realize that they are play (recall Marx's "men" make
>>> history but not of their own choosing). Additionally, once we call it
>>> "play" we assume that it is "unreal" (cf. "social constructionism" lit of
>>> the mid to late 20th century). Yet this play is a highly consequential
>> form
>>> of play because, well, there are "winners" and there are "losers", and
>> the
>>> consequence of "winning" or "losing" is dire (perhaps this is why the
>> movie
>>> Hunger Games strikes a chord with people today? b.c. they see the world
>>> today, mid-recession, as akin to a fight to the death).
>>> 
>>> Anyway, hopefully there is a grain of sense in all of this play with play
>>> (in play).
>>> 
>>> and please, let me know if I'm terribly off-base here...
>>> 
>>> Playfully,
>>> greg
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> On Tue, Jun 24, 2014 at 7:51 AM, Lois Holzman <
>>> lholzman@eastsideinstitute.org> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> Don't forget yourself, Artin!
>>>> Lois
>>>> 
>>>> Lois Holzman
>>>> Director, East Side Institute for Group & Short Term Psychotherapy
>>>> 104-106 South Oxford Street
>>>> Brooklyn, New York 11217
>>>> Chair, Global Outreach, All Stars Project, UX
>>>> Tel. +1.212.941.8906 x324
>>>> Fax +1.718.797.3966
>>>> lholzman@eastsideinstitute.org
>>>> Social Media
>>>> Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter
>>>> Blogs
>>>> Psychology Today| Psychology of Becoming | ESI Community News
>>>> Websites
>>>> Lois Holzman | East Side Institute | Performing the World
>>>> All Stars Project
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> On Jun 23, 2014, at 7:09 PM, Goncu, Artin <goncu@uic.edu> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> First, this is a quick note to say that I enjoyed Lois' talk, and
>> second,
>>>>> I enjoyed reading the responses to Lois' talk very much.  I also wanted
>>>> to
>>>>> add that there are others on this list who have been addressing some of
>>>>> the important issues raised both in Lois' talk and in the responses to
>>>> it.
>>>>> For example, issues about play being a collective, dialectical, and
>>>>> dialogic activity improvised in human interaction are examined by Tony
>>>>> Perone, Carrie Lobman, Keith Sawyer, and others..
>>>>> 
>>>>> All the best, ag
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> On Mon, June 23, 2014 11:58 am, Lois Holzman wrote:
>>>>>> Thanks, Tom. (I tried.)
>>>>>> And I didn't realize I forgot the link.
>>>>>> All best,
>>>>>> Lois
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Lois Holzman
>>>>>> Director, East Side Institute for Group & Short Term Psychotherapy
>>>>>> 104-106 South Oxford Street
>>>>>> Brooklyn, New York 11217
>>>>>> Chair, Global Outreach, All Stars Project, UX
>>>>>> Tel. +1.212.941.8906 x324
>>>>>> Fax +1.718.797.3966
>>>>>> lholzman@eastsideinstitute.org
>>>>>> Social Media
>>>>>> Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter
>>>>>> Blogs
>>>>>> Psychology Today| Psychology of Becoming | ESI Community News
>>>>>> Websites
>>>>>> Lois Holzman | East Side Institute | Performing the World
>>>>>> All Stars Project
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> On Jun 23, 2014, at 11:19 AM, Tom Richardson
>>>>>> <tom.richardson3@googlemail.com> wrote:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Thank you, Lois, for finding time for this thoughtful reply to the
>>>>>>> threads
>>>>>>> around your TED piece -a link to your 'What's developing is below:
>>>>>>> http://vimeo.com/98797556
>>>>>>> Tom
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> On 23 June 2014 16:01, Lois Holzman <lholzman@eastsideinstitute.org>
>>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> Thanks to all who've watched the video and commented.
>>>>>>>> Over the weekend I completed two weeks of PLAYING WITH a "small
>> group"
>>>>>>>> of
>>>>>>>> psychologists/youth workers/educators from 5 countries who were in
>> NYC
>>>>>>>> for
>>>>>>>> their final residency period with me and the Institute. I kept up
>> with
>>>>>>>> your
>>>>>>>> posts but wasn't able to respond until now.
>>>>>>>> I find the discussion fascinating in a few ways, which I will try to
>>>>>>>> describe through commenting on what's been said/written.
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> I greatly appreciated Tom's concern ("We need Play to evolve the
>> next
>>>>>>>> tranche of revolutionary strategy and
>>>>>>>>> tactics, but Play alone will never arrive at the necessity for
>>>>>>>>> revolutionary overthrow of capitalism") and further comment and
>>>>>>>> subsequent expansion on this ("While I did not wish to attack or
>>>> offend
>>>>>>>> deliberately, I feel that the
>>>>>>>> limitations of work within individual/small group relationships, no
>>>>>>>> matter
>>>>>>>> how creative, redemptive and transformative, cannot have that same
>>>>>>>> effect
>>>>>>>> upon the 500year-developed /developing reality which is modern
>>>>>>>> bourgeois
>>>>>>>> society. It is that sense of limitation which I attempted,
>>>>>>>>> straightforwardly to convey").
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> Tom, I in no way felt attacked or offended.
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> I found Shirley and Helen's and Carol's versions of what I was
>> doing
>>>>>>>>> in
>>>>>>>> the talk and what the activities I presented might be "about" very
>>>>>>>> helpful
>>>>>>>> and appreciated learning what they saw.  I was indeed trying to
>>>> present
>>>>>>>> something new to the audience, something that gave them the feeling
>>>>>>>> that
>>>>>>>> there was more "behind it" and that something was pretty unorthodox.
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> I suppose the key thing I can say in response is that I was
>> speaking
>>>>>>>> about play in a very particular way, as revolutionary. I was really
>>>>>>>> pleased
>>>>>>>> that the audience for the live presentation picked up on that and
>> was
>>>>>>>> excited by this new way of seeing. What I think revolutionary play
>> is
>>>>>>>> (in
>>>>>>>> my talk I repeated what I mean by that several times—taking what
>> there
>>>>>>>> is
>>>>>>>> and making something new, doing what we do not know how to do,
>>>> relating
>>>>>>>> as
>>>>>>>> who we are/other than who we are at the same time) is a
>>>>>>>> cultural-historical
>>>>>>>> activity that creates development, and that all of us human beings
>>>> need
>>>>>>>> to
>>>>>>>> develop if we are to have a shot at overthrowing capitalism. (For
>>>>>>>> "theory"
>>>>>>>> the most concise expansion of this might be All Power to the
>>>>>>>> Developing.The
>>>>>>>> position put forth in that article has generated lively dialogue, as
>>>> it
>>>>>>>> is
>>>>>>>> not the most popular among Marxists.)
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> As I read some of the comments on my talk, it seems to me that how
>> I
>>>>>>>> understand play as revolutionary was not taken into account fully.
>> By
>>>>>>>> that
>>>>>>>> I mean it seems like one's own understanding of play was substituted
>>>>>>>> unaware. Perhaps this has something to do with Hue seeing play as
>>>>>>>> "overdone" as well as David's commenting:
>>>>>>>>> "One of the problems of Lois's talk is that it doesn't give us a
>> very
>>>>>>>> clear
>>>>>>>> view of what play is not. But I would say that street kids talking
>> to
>>>>>>>> policemen about their fear of being gunned down in the street is a
>>>>>>>> pretty
>>>>>>>> good place to start. Lois herself recognizes in her talk that the
>>>>>>>> conversations are not part of
>>>>>>>> the play. But then we need to look at when and where the activity
>>>>>>>> stopped
>>>>>>>> being play, and above all why. Otherwise we rob "play" of all of its
>>>>>>>> content."
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> Sorry, David, if I was less than clear here. For me, the
>> conversation
>>>>>>>> was
>>>>>>>> part of the play. The activity never stopped being play, as I
>>>>>>>> understand
>>>>>>>> it. The cops and kids were playing, in my sense of revolutionary
>> play,
>>>>>>>> as
>>>>>>>> they were creating a conversation they had never had and perhaps
>> could
>>>>>>>> not
>>>>>>>> were they not playing/performing...they were doing what was beyond
>>>> them
>>>>>>>> and
>>>>>>>> creating something new together. I imagine you and others may not
>> see
>>>>>>>> it
>>>>>>>> that way, but that's what I see.
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> David's comments also highlight for me an aspect of perhaps
>> different
>>>>>>>> ways
>>>>>>>> of approaching what it means to engage in the activity of
>>>>>>>> understanding. As
>>>>>>>> I read you, you need me to say what play is not and you also need me
>>>> to
>>>>>>>> pinpoint the beginnings and endings of something identified as play.
>>>>>>>> It's
>>>>>>>> that "is" that for me is the problematic term—it reads to me as
>>>>>>>> pictorial
>>>>>>>> and essentializing in reference to meaning. Apologies if I have
>>>>>>>> misunderstood you. And while I don't mind playing being
>> simultaneously
>>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>>> "leading activity" and the constant activity, I'm inspired by
>>>> Vygotsky,
>>>>>>>> not
>>>>>>>> overdetermined by him.
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> I'm very sensitive to how we speak/write to each other, however,
>>>>>>>> especially when difference of opinion gets in the way or replaces
>>>>>>>> curiosity
>>>>>>>> to learn more about how come someone thinks/believes what they
>>>>>>>> apparently
>>>>>>>> do. And so I wish that we would be asking more questions of each
>>>>>>>> other...
>>>>>>>> and perhaps saying things in less absolutist and knowing terms.
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> David (again) wrote:
>>>>>>>> PS: Obviously, the teacher who claimed that their generation in
>> China
>>>>>>>> (my
>>>>>>>> wife's generation) did not play after the age of two was just
>> playing
>>>>>>>> around with poor Lois. But that's no reason to play along...
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> I "obviously" (and here it makes sense to use that word) cannot know
>>>>>>>> your
>>>>>>>> intention in writing what and how you wrote the above, as we cannot
>>>>>>>> know
>>>>>>>> each other's intentions. So I'll jump off from what you say and
>> maybe
>>>>>>>> help
>>>>>>>> you see what I was trying to convey—75 teachers (not 1) told us in
>>>>>>>> different ways/phrases that they hadn't played since they were very
>>>>>>>> little
>>>>>>>> children. They weren't making any claims, neither for themselves as
>>>>>>>> individuals and certainly not for their generation. They were
>> talking
>>>>>>>> with
>>>>>>>> us and sharing their experiences. I assume your wife has done the
>> same
>>>>>>>> with
>>>>>>>> you, and that would be interesting to learn about.
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> I'm off tonight to work in Frankfurt for the week, but if there is
>>>>>>>> further
>>>>>>>> conversation I will respond quickly.
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> If any of you are interested in pursuing the topic of play and
>>>>>>>> performance
>>>>>>>> in our current context of capitalism's crisis, from my community's
>>>>>>>> perspective, you can view an event, What Developing in a World in
>>>>>>>> Crisis
>>>>>>>> which begins with 9 people from 8 countries speaking to how they see
>>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>>> development challenges in their countries, followed by a
>> conversation
>>>>>>>> between me and a colleague, and then the audience.
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> Again, thanks for including me, TED, play in your discussions,
>>>>>>>> Lois
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> Lois Holzman
>>>>>>>> Director, East Side Institute for Group & Short Term Psychotherapy
>>>>>>>> 104-106 South Oxford Street
>>>>>>>> Brooklyn, New York 11217
>>>>>>>> Chair, Global Outreach, All Stars Project, UX
>>>>>>>> Tel. +1.212.941.8906 x324
>>>>>>>> Fax +1.718.797.3966
>>>>>>>> lholzman@eastsideinstitute.org
>>>>>>>> Social Media
>>>>>>>> Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter
>>>>>>>> Blogs
>>>>>>>> Psychology Today| Psychology of Becoming | ESI Community News
>>>>>>>> Websites
>>>>>>>> Lois Holzman | East Side Institute | Performing the World
>>>>>>>> All Stars Project
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> On Jun 22, 2014, at 1:31 AM, mike cole <lchcmike@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> I wonder what Lois thinks about all of this discussion that Peter
>>>>>>>> started?
>>>>>>>>> Mike
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> On Friday, June 20, 2014, David Kellogg <dkellogg60@gmail.com>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>>>> I agree completely with Tom's remarks. I remember that almost every
>>>>>>>> summer
>>>>>>>>> in Chicago between five and ten black children in the city would be
>>>>>>>>> murdered by police for playing with toy guns. Consider this:
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>> 
>> http://www.mintpressnews.com/us-police-murdered-5000-innocent-civilians-since-911/172029/
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> To link this to the previous thread--I don't think that the article
>>>>>>>>> "What
>>>>>>>>> Theory is Not" has a workable definition of theory, and for that
>>>>>>>>> reason I
>>>>>>>>> found it little more than a list of complaints. But part of the
>>>>>>>> dialectical
>>>>>>>>> method is defining what things are by looking at what things are
>>>>>>>>> not: transgressing that boundary is precisely what we mean when we
>>>> say
>>>>>>>> that
>>>>>>>>> something is in the process of becoming what it is not.
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> One of the problems of Lois's talk is that it doesn't give us a
>> very
>>>>>>>> clear
>>>>>>>>> view of what play is not. But I would say that street kids talking
>> to
>>>>>>>>> policemen about their fear of being gunned down in the street is a
>>>>>>>>> pretty
>>>>>>>>> good place to start.
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> Lois herself recognizes in her talk that the conversations are not
>>>>>>>>> part
>>>>>>>> of
>>>>>>>>> the play. But then we need to look at when and where the activity
>>>>>>>>> stopped
>>>>>>>>> being play, and above all why. Otherwise we rob "play" of all of
>> its
>>>>>>>>> content.
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> I think the same thing is true when we say that children play
>>>>>>>>> constantly,
>>>>>>>>> from the moment they wake up to the moment they go to bed (and
>>>>>>>>> Vygotsky,
>>>>>>>> of
>>>>>>>>> course, says the opposite--play is a "leading" activity but for
>> that
>>>>>>>>> very
>>>>>>>>> reason we cannot say it is the main activity).
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> David Kellogg
>>>>>>>>> Hankuk University of Foreign Studies
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> PS: Obviously, the teacher who claimed that their generation in
>> China
>>>>>>>>> (my
>>>>>>>>> wife's generation) did not play after the age of two was just
>> playing
>>>>>>>>> around with poor Lois. But that's no reason to play along...
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> dk
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> On 20 June 2014 06:03, Tom Richardson <
>>>> tom.richardson3@googlemail.com>
>>>>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>> A fascinating and moving 14+minutes of Lois ....only how I wish
>> that
>>>>>>>>>> I
>>>>>>>> did
>>>>>>>>>> not subscribe to a class analysis which means that the last
>> example
>>>>>>>>>> of
>>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>>>>> 'kids of colour' and the NYPD is called into deep question - will
>>>> the
>>>>>>>>>> lethal divides of capitalism's "special bodies of armed men" from
>>>>>>>>>> working-class citizens, (and of course it extends to imperialism's
>>>>>>>>>> destruction of whole countries), be 'overcome' by Play. Lois'
>>>>>>>> commitment
>>>>>>>>>> and passionate intelligence almost lets me believe it might, but I
>>>>>>>>>> know
>>>>>>>>>> that I'm fooling myself.
>>>>>>>>>> We need Play to evolve the next tranche of revolutionary strategy
>>>> and
>>>>>>>>>> tactics, but Play alone will never arrive at the necessity for
>>>>>>>>>> revolutionary overthrow of capitalism, only, from Lois' examples,
>>>>>>>>>> ultimately futile attempts at transcending class conflict,
>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>> Tom Richardson
>>>>>>>>>> Middlesbrough
>>>>>>>>>> UK
>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>> On 19 June 2014 20:57, Carol Macdonald <carolmacdon@gmail.com>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>> Well Lois
>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>> That was splendid, awesome! All you serious XMCAers please watch.
>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>> Carol
>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>> On 19 June 2014 13:48, Lois Holzman <
>>>> lholzman@eastsideinstitute.org>
>>>>>>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>> Here's the link, Carol.
>>>>>>>>>>>> http://tedxnavesink.com/project/lois-holzman/
>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>> Lois Holzman
>>>>>>>>>>>> Director, East Side Institute for Group & Short Term
>> Psychotherapy
>>>>>>>>>>>> 104-106 South Oxford Street
>>>>>>>>>>>> Brooklyn, New York 11217
>>>>>>>>>>>> Chair, Global Outreach, All Stars Project, UX
>>>>>>>>>>>> Tel. +1.212.941.8906 x324
>>>>>>>>>>>> Fax +1.718.797.3966
>>>>>>>>>>>> lholzman@eastsideinstitute.org
>>>>>>>>>>>> Social Media
>>>>>>>>>>>> Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter
>>>>>>>>>>>> Blogs
>>>>>>>>>>>> Psychology Today| Psychology of Becoming | ESI Community News
>>>>>>>>>>>> Websites
>>>>>>>>>>>> Lois Holzman | East Side Institute | Performing the World
>>>>>>>>>>>> All Stars Project
>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>> On Jun 19, 2014, at 3:02 AM, Carol Macdonald <
>>>>>>>> carolmacdon@gmail.com>
>>>>>>>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>> Louis
>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>> Please could you send the link again?
>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>> Thanks
>>>>>>>>>>>>> Carol
>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>> On 19 June 2014 01:03, Lois Holzman <
>>>>>>>> lholzman@eastsideinstitute.org>
>>>>>>>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Hi All,
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Peter kindly posted a link to a talk I gave last month at a
>> TEDx
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> event--TEDxNavesink Play.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Aside from the prep being among the hardest things I've ever
>>>>>>>> done
>>>>>>>>>>>> (staying
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> within their rules and structure, not being academic but
>> saying
>>>>>>>>>>>> something
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> new for people to think about, and more), it was a delight to
>> be
>>>>>>>>>> with
>>>>>>>>>>>> folks
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> who appreciate and value play--many of whom are affording
>>>>>>>> people in
>>>>>>>>>>>> their
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> communities with the opportunity to play in all kinds of ways.
>>>>>>>> It
>>>>>>>>>> was
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> really growthful for me and my team. I was really pleased to
>>>>>>>>>> reconnect
>>>>>>>>>>>> with
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Peter Gray after many years and to meet other good people. The
>>>>>>>>>> one-day
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> event was organized are 4 P's--possibility, pleasure, progress
>>>>>>>> and
>>>>>>>>>>>> paradox.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> I invite you all to include these talks within your
>> conversation
>>>>>>>>>>>> here--even
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> though they're not theoretical. Maybe it's a new kind of play
>>>>>>>> for
>>>>>>>>>>> many.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Lois
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Lois Holzman
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Director, East Side Institute for Group & Short Term
>>>>>>>> Psychotherapy
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 104-106 South Oxford Street
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Brooklyn, New York 11217
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Chair, Global Outreach, All Stars Project, UX
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Tel. +1.212.941.8906 x324
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Fax +1.718.797.3966
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> lholzman@eastsideinstitute.org
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Social Media
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Blogs
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Psychology Today| Psychology of Becoming | ESI Community News
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Websites
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Lois Holzman | East Side Institute | Performing the World
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> All Stars Project
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>>>>>>>> Carol A  Macdonald Ph D (Edin)
>>>>>>>>>>>>> Developmental psycholinguist
>>>>>>>>>>>>> Academic, Researcher,  and Editor
>>>>>>>>>>>>> Honorary Research Fellow: Department of Linguistics, Unisa
>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>>>>>> Carol A  Macdonald Ph D (Edin)
>>>>>>>>>>> Developmental psycholinguist
>>>>>>>>>>> Academic, Researcher,  and Editor
>>>>>>>>>>> Honorary Research Fellow: Department of Linguistics, Unisa
>>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> Artin Goncu, Ph.D
>>>>> Co-editor, Mind, Culture, and Activity:An International Journal
>>>>> Professor Emeritus,
>>>>> University of Illinois at Chicago
>>>>> College of Education M/C 147
>>>>> 1040 W. Harrison St.
>>>>> Chicago, IL 60607
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> --
>>> Gregory A. Thompson, Ph.D.
>>> Assistant Professor
>>> Department of Anthropology
>>> 883 Spencer W. Kimball Tower
>>> Brigham Young University
>>> Provo, UT 84602
>>> http://byu.academia.edu/GregoryThompson
>> 
>>