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[Xmca-l] Re: Interesting "post-apocalyptic" playground



And from that same web page, I found Penny Wilson's Playwork Primer to be
rather interesting:
http://www.allianceforchildhood.org/sites/allianceforchildhood.org/files/file/PlayworkPrimer_2010.pdf

In particular, Wilson's notion of the "adulteration" of play made me think
of Beth Ferholt's work with play in a pre-school(?) classroom where the
(very talented and well-intentioned) teacher keeps trying to encourage the
kids to follow a particular path but the kids manage to find a different
solution.

Might we say that the kids come to an "un-adulterated" solution!

Here is the link to Beth's video:
http://vimeo.com/15011909

-greg




On Sat, Apr 26, 2014 at 10:00 AM, Greg Thompson
<greg.a.thompson@gmail.com>wrote:

> I thought that this was a fascinating way of taking play beyond what we
> have imagined - allowing kids to play with fire, sharp sticks, and other
> "dangerous" objects:
>
> http://transom.org/2013/of-kith-and-kin/
>
> The link is about the making of a video about this playground, but there
> are great images and videos that describe the playground.
>
> Seems fascinating, no?
>
> What do you think? Does play need to be more structured than this? How
> does this fit with the CHAT view of play?
>
> -greg
>
> --
> Gregory A. Thompson, Ph.D.
> Assistant Professor
> Department of Anthropology
> 883 Spencer W. Kimball Tower
> Brigham Young University
> Provo, UT 84602
> http://byu.academia.edu/GregoryThompson
>



-- 
Gregory A. Thompson, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Anthropology
883 Spencer W. Kimball Tower
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602
http://byu.academia.edu/GregoryThompson