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[Xmca-l] Re: Psychology of Language



Huw, I'm not disagreeing. It's just that I'm not sure what it is in Whitney's book that you're responding to. I have the impression it's a generally cognitive approach to language, and that's one reason I would like to find something better.

What would an ideal cultural-historical textbook on language and psychology include?

- language acquisition (with an emphasis on pragmatics and discourse)
- language and nonverbal communication
- the evolution of language
- language and the brain: not simply localization, but the way lueracy transforms the brain, etc.
- language and thought: LSV and newer research
- language and the oher psychological functions as a dynamic system
- linguistics from a systemic functional approach (plus Chomsky as a contrast?)
- (cross-cultural studies of) language and perception (color?)
- metaphor a la Lakoff...
...???

Laure, I would be very interested to see your syllabus, though my French is lousy!

Martin

On Apr 24, 2014, at 5:10 PM, Huw Lloyd <huw.softdesigns@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 24 April 2014 22:57, Martin John Packer <mpacker@uniandes.edu.co> wrote:
> 
>> But the efforts to teach language to non-humans are interesting, no? And
>> they generally employ signs rather than words. I think there's general
>> awareness that language need not be verbal.
>> 
>> 
> Yes, but what about the history of experience evoked by the tongue or
> finger wagging?
> 
> What will you have: language as a carrier and, oh, there's this other thing
> called culture?
> 
> For nature of language, you could study toddlers.  That's enough to
> indicate that "language as signing" is a phoney division.
> 
> Best,
> Huw
> 
> 
> 
>> Martin
>> 
>> On Apr 24, 2014, at 4:46 PM, Huw Lloyd <huw.softdesigns@gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>>> Its not entirely clear from the contents, but it looks like the author is
>>> reinforcing notions of language as wordiness ("Attempts to teach language
>>> to non-humans").  I would start by debunking that.
>>> 
>>> Best,
>>> Huw
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> On 24 April 2014 22:16, Martin John Packer <mpacker@uniandes.edu.co>
>> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> Huw,
>>>> 
>>>> If you click on the link I included in an earlier message you can see
>> the
>>>> contents of this typical undergraduate text. Here it is again:
>>>> 
>>>> <
>> http://www.amazon.com/The-Psychology-Language-Paul-Whitney/dp/0395757509>
>>>> 
>>>> And here are the sections and chapter titles. Let me say that I am by no
>>>> means a great fan of these themes, but there are some limits to the
>>>> innovations that one can introduce at the undergraduate level, sadly. A
>>>> text that adopted a sociocultural perspective on psychology and language
>>>> would provide legitimacy to a course that was a bit less traditional, if
>>>> you know what I mean!
>>>> 
>>>> Language and its functions
>>>>       The nature of language
>>>>       What language users must know
>>>>       Language in relation to other cognitive processes
>>>>       Theories of the language-thought relationship
>>>> Models of language processing
>>>>       The recognition of spoken words
>>>>       Visual word recognition
>>>>       Sentence processing
>>>>       Understanding and remembering discourse
>>>>       Language production and conversation
>>>> Language and the brain
>>>>       Language acquisition: Biological foundations
>>>>       Language acquisition in special circumstances
>>>>       Language and the localization of function
>>>> Conclusions
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> On Apr 24, 2014, at 11:58 AM, Huw Lloyd <huw.softdesigns@gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>>> I am puzzled and curious about what constitutes an undergraduate text
>>>> for a
>>>>> rich, involving and open-ended subject.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Are you starting from the subject first, and then working out how to
>>>>> deliver it in bite size examinable chunks (if these constraints apply),
>>>> and
>>>>> how are you (considering) dealing with the open-endedness of the
>>>> topics...?
>>>>> 
>>>>> Is the major issue about accessibility of content?  What about
>> compliance
>>>>> with other concepts and procedures in the course...?
>>>>> 
>>>>> How about taking one interesting text and critiquing it (in a
>> structured
>>>>> way)?  E.g. how blind-deaf people learn to language (Meshcheryakov), or
>>>>> changes in language due to culture (Luria), or more about language
>> itself
>>>>> and its cultural aspects.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Perhaps the text, itself, would benefit from being quite small so
>>>> students
>>>>> can go and look up the references.  1st (or 2nd) hand  material is a
>> good
>>>>> choice!
>>>>> 
>>>>> Hope this helps...
>>>>> Huw
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> On 24 April 2014 15:46, Martin John Packer <mpacker@uniandes.edu.co>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>>> Hi Laure,
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> In general I'm also in favor of dispersed readings. In addition, in my
>>>>>> course in child development I've been writing the textbook that I
>> need!
>>>> It
>>>>>> is (currently) titled "A Cultural Psychology of Children’s
>> Development."
>>>>>> But this is a new course that I need to get up and running quickly,
>> so I
>>>>>> think I need to start with an existing text. If one exists!
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Martin
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> On Apr 24, 2014, at 8:42 AM, Laure Kloetzer <laure.kloetzer@gmail.com
>>>>>> <mailto:laure.kloetzer@gmail.com>> wrote:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Hi Martin,
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> We are teaching a similar course here at CNAM, Paris. But in French...
>>>> and
>>>>>> no textbook, we suggest and comment dispersed readings. Would you send
>>>> me
>>>>>> your syllabus ? I would be very happy to compare (our plan is in
>>>> French, if
>>>>>> you read French, I'll be happy to share).
>>>>>> Also interested to see if you get some answers regarding the text
>> book.
>>>>>> If not: why wouldn't we edit this textbook that we need ?
>>>>>> Cheers
>>>>>> LK
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 2014-04-24 15:35 GMT+02:00 Martin John Packer <
>> mpacker@uniandes.edu.co
>>>>>> <mailto:mpacker@uniandes.edu.co>>:
>>>>>> Hi Bella,
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Thanks, but what I'm looking for is a text on the role of language in
>>>>>> psychology. I'm teaching a course that when last taught used this
>> text,
>>>>>> which was published in 1998. I'd like something more contemporary, and
>>>> more
>>>>>> aligned with a sociocultural perspective:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> <
>>>> 
>> http://www.amazon.com/The-Psychology-Language-Paul-Whitney/dp/0395757509>
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Martin
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> On Apr 23, 2014, at 11:55 PM, Bella Kotik-Friedgut <
>>>> bella.kotik@gmail.com
>>>>>> <mailto:bella.kotik@gmail.com>> wrote:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Martin, if you mean something like the following
>>>>>>> Williams, M. & Burden, R. (1997). *Psychology for Language
>>>>>>> Teachers,*Cambridge Language Library.
>>>>>>> I am teaching a course: Psychological aspects of new language
>> learning
>>>>>> and
>>>>>>> teaching.
>>>>>>> So if you need something more specific please ask.
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Sincerely yours Bella Kotik-Friedgut
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> On Thu, Apr 24, 2014 at 2:39 AM, Martin John Packer <
>>>>>> mpacker@uniandes.edu.co<mailto:mpacker@uniandes.edu.co>
>>>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> Can anyone recommend a good undergraduate textbook on Psychology
>>>> and/of
>>>>>>>> Language?
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> Martin
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>> 
>> 
>>