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[Xmca-l] Re: German experts: erlibnis vs. befindlichkeit?



A most interesting thread. For what it's worth, Vygotsky is known to have
read German (Wertsch, J. V. (1985). Vygotsky and the social formation of
mind. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press) so the absence/delay of a
Russian translation in itself, would not have prevented his reading "Being
and Time" in the original.


On Sun, Mar 30, 2014 at 10:11 AM, Martin John Packer <
mpacker@uniandes.edu.co> wrote:

> Hi Greg,
>
> The Russian term used to translate Befindlichkeit seems to be
> настроенность, nastroennost’. Sein und Zeit was published in 1927; I don't
> know when it was translated into Russian. (A book by Maryse Dennes suggests
> that translation was very late:
> <
> http://books.google.com.co/books?hl=en&lr=&id=mFEbRNqqfKEC&oi=fnd&pg=PA7&dq=maryse+dennes&ots=kkAXTFNUHw&sig=Dg8fULSIeJ9kd2InipP7E2XSLvk&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=Sein%20und%20Zeit&f=false
> >
>
> Thomas Seifrid (The Word Made Self) claims that Sein und Zeit (Heidegger's
> first academic publication, I believe) was first reviewed in Russia in
> 1928. All of which suggests it was pretty late to have influenced Vygotsky.
>
> Martin
>
> On Mar 29, 2014, at 4:20 PM, Ed Wall <ewall@umich.edu> wrote:
>
> > Geoff
> >
> >     Inwood spends a bit of time (around page 62 in A Heidegger
> Dictionary) discussing Heidegger's thinking about erlibnis (he says among
> other things that Heidegger was wary of the term and used it to somewhat
> suggest 'experience,' but that Heidegger saw it as expressing an inner
> event intrinsically detached both from the body and the external world).
> Befindlichkeit (Inwood is reasonable here also), on the other hand and for
> Heidegger, refers to 'being in a mood' or 'how we sense ourselves' (it is a
> bit more complicated than this for Heidegger). To regard moods as
> experiences, for Heidegger, ignores the way in which they disclose Dasein
> and the World.
> >
> >     I, by the way, know quite a bit more Heidegger than German (smile).
> >
> > Ed
> >
> > On Mar 29, 2014, at  3:34 PM, Greg Thompson wrote:
> >
> >> Trying to figure out the main differences between erlebnis and
> >> befindlichkeit. Anyone?
> >>
> >> My question stems from the fact that in the marxists.org version of
> >> Vygotsky's The Problem of the Environment, the editor (Andy?) notes:
> >> "The Russian term *perezhivanie *serves to express the idea that one and
> >> the same objective situation may be interpreted, perceived, experienced
> or
> >> lived through by different children in different ways. Neither
> 'emotional
> >> experience' (which is used here and which only covers the affective
> aspect
> >> of the meaning of *perezhivanie*), nor 'interpretation' (which is too
> >> exclusively rational) are fully adequate translations of the noun. Its
> >> meaning is closely linked to that of the German verb 'erleben' (cf.
> >> 'Erlebnis', 'erlebte Wirklichkeit')."
> >>
> >> Having some very minimal familiarity with the German term Befindlichkeit
> >> (my source: http://www.focusing.org/gendlin_befindlichkeit.html), I was
> >> wondering what kinds of differences exist between these terms. (part of
> the
> >> interest here is in Vygotsky-Heidegger connections - befindlichkeit was
> a
> >> central term for Heidegger).
> >>
> >> Seems like erlebnis would be more of the romantic tradition (pace
> Dilthey)
> >> and might therefore be the more likely term for Vygotsky's perezhivanie
> to
> >> map onto, but just wondering about if there is more to this link.
> >>
> >> Any info much appreciated.
> >> -greg
> >>
> >> --
> >> Gregory A. Thompson, Ph.D.
> >> Assistant Professor
> >> Department of Anthropology
> >> 883 Spencer W. Kimball Tower
> >> Brigham Young University
> >> Provo, UT 84602
> >> http://byu.academia.edu/GregoryThompson
> >
> >
>
>
>
Status: O