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[Xmca-l] Re: Call for papers on mind wandering and reading and writing



On 30 January 2014 14:25, Larry Purss <lpscholar2@gmail.com> wrote:

> Reverie, revelation, revealing, seem to be notions of wandering in and
> surprising us.
> I also am intrigued with this topic and its relation to [intentionality]
> and the now current focus on *self*-regulation AND co-regulation.
> This notion on focussing AND discipline AS learning as the process from
> moving through intentionality towards automaticity. Is this process related
> to wander kind as pivoting   [synthesis] betwee wondering and wandering.
>
> Programs such as *tools of the mind* whose intent is to help adults become
> far more intentional on how they intervene to bring the child to
> intentional ways of being focused and directed as the way to move towards
> automaticity.
>
> Intentionality within the zone of proximal development may need to be
> EXPANDED to INCLUDE wander kind?
>

I think it already is, Larry.  Intentionality is construed as goal, whilst
nascent proximal formations are expressed in terms of motive.

Best,
Huw


> Larry
>
>
> On Thu, Jan 30, 2014 at 12:08 AM, Rod Parker-Rees <
> R.Parker-Rees@plymouth.ac.uk> wrote:
>
> > I am looking forward to these papers too! I have always thought of
> > mind-wandering and daydreaming as an internalised form of playfulness
> and a
> > useful way of making it more likely that you will come across hitherto
> > unnoticed connections and paths. But I think there is also much to be
> said
> > for helping children (and adults) to develop their ability to move
> between
> > wandering and more focused (even blinkered) forms of attention - one of
> > which would be mindfulness. Wandering is lovely when you are not under
> > pressure to be somewhere by a certain time but sometimes it makes sense
> to
> > take a familiar route or to plan a route in advance!
> >
> > All the best,
> >
> > Rod
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu [mailto:
> > xmca-l-bounces@mailman.ucsd.edu] On Behalf Of Andy Blunden
> > Sent: 30 January 2014 04:09
> > To: eXtended Mind, Culture, Activity
> > Subject: [Xmca-l] Re: Call for papers on mind wandering and reading and
> > writing
> >
> > Without any scientific justification at all, I tend to see it that way as
> > well, Mike. I have a terrible deficit of focus and (much to Vonney's
> > annoyance) often don't see what is under my nose, but that is because my
> > mind is wandering all the time, and I have no intention, and never had,
> of
> > trying to do anything about that, to "discipline" my mind, because I
> > absolutely rely on whatever it is which is going on when I am not
> thinking
> > about something.
> > Some people are different. Vonney has incredible perception. She sees
> > things (and smells, and hears) which are invisible to me, but she has
> great
> > difficulty in seeing what is not there. This becomes an issue for us when
> > it comes to interior design/renovations, etc. She always does a fantastic
> > job, in the end, but it takes lots of work to visualise the object before
> > it is produced, usually relying on finding pictures of the same thing
> done
> > by someone else in magazine. The opposite for me. I can see it before it
> is
> > built easily, but I do not have the same discrimination, so it is no use.
> > I would love to read whatever comes out of this call for papers. But I
> > would be interested even more if it were not exclusively focussed on
> > education and children. Us adults apprehend the world differently too.
> >
> > Andy
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > *Andy Blunden*
> > http://home.mira.net/~andy/
> >
> >
> > mike cole wrote:
> > > David-- Mind wandering is the flip side of mindful meditation, right?
> > > There was an article, I believe in the NYTimes about the differential
> > > efficacy of mindful mediation on mental power that included a flip
> > > side of lack of creativity which mind wanderwind was supposed to take
> > > care of.
> > >
> > > Right?
> > >
> > > I believe this discussion bears an important relation to CHAT theory.
> > > But maybe I have the topic all wrong and its all in my, lets call it,
> > > imagination.
> > >
> > > mike
> > >
> > >
> > > On Wed, Jan 29, 2014 at 6:36 PM, Andy Blunden <ablunden@mira.net
> > > <mailto:ablunden@mira.net>> wrote:
> > >
> > >     What a ....er fascinating topic .... um ... I was going to say ...
> > er.
> > >     Interesting, David.
> > >     andy
> > >
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >     *Andy Blunden*
> > >     http://home.mira.net/~andy/ <http://home.mira.net/%7Eandy/>
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >     David Preiss wrote:
> > >
> > >         Call for papers on mind wandering and reading and writing for
> > >         a special section of Learning and Individual Differences
> > >         The research on the impact of mind wandering on the learning
> > >         process and education is mixed. Thus, some researchers have
> > >         noted that mind wandering negatively impacts students'
> > >         performance on school related abilities requiring high levels
> > >         of concentration and metacognition, such as reading, attending
> > >         lectures or, more specifically, performance on standardized
> > >         measures of academic achievement. Yet, other researchers have
> > >         noticed that mind wandering is a regular part of everyday
> > >         normal functioning and have called attention to its positive
> > >         impact on emotional processing, creativity and problem
> > >         solving. Additionally, the research literature has reported
> > >         that there are individual differences not only in people's
> > >         tendency to engage in mind wandering but also in the content
> > >         of this wandering. These differences have consequences for how
> > >         adaptive mind wandering may be in everyday functioning and,
> > >         specifically, within educational contexts. Here, we seek
> > >         contributions that represent inno
> > >         vative research on individual differences in mind wandering
> > >         that: a) synthesize insights from multiple approaches and
> > >         perspectives on individual differences in mind wandering; b)
> > >         focus on the integration of research on mind wandering with
> > >         research on school related cognitive abilities with special
> > >         attention on those that are part and parcel of the core of the
> > >         schooling process (reading, writing and mathematics); c)
> > >         relate mind wandering with the development of abilities and
> > >         processes that, although not specifically academic, play a
> > >         relevant role in schooling and education such as creativity,
> > >         divergent thinking, imagination, and problem solving, among
> > >         others; d) and investigate the connection between mind
> > >         wandering and school related performance at different stages
> > >         of schooling, from elementary school through college. Special
> > >         consideration will be given to articles that place mind
> > >         wandering in the context of overall human development.
> > >         Original research and review articles wil
> > >         l be considered. Submissions allow two formats: full-length
> > >         articles (10,000 words) and short empirical reports or case
> > >         studies (5,000 words); the page limits do not include the
> > >         abstract, references, figures, or tables. Articles should
> > >         reach the editorial office before June 30th 2014 to receive
> > >         full consideration. When submitting articles, authors should
> > >         indicate that their manuscript is intended for the special
> > >         issue (mind wandering). Contact David Preiss
> > >         (davidpreiss@uc.cl <mailto:davidpreiss@uc.cl>) if you have
> > >         questions about the submission.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
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